Signs of life

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori, you have lots of plants I am not acquainted with! For instance I have many L. vernus but never heard of gracilis and so on. Do you know how many plants you have totally?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Nice Lathyrus Lori.....I think I have that one too but under another variety name....I'll have to check my records.

Just about to place my order with Wrightman's Alpines.  My order includes Androsace mariae, Arnebia echioides, Dracocephalum imberbe, Hirpicium armerioides, Moltkia petraea, Mertensia alpina, Phlox kelseyi 'Lemhi Midnight', Pulmonaria altaica (loved yours Lori!) and Scutellaria prostrata.

We have had 10 days of sun in a row!  It will come to a crashing halt tomorrow....next 2 weeks is rain, drizzle and fog and only 3-4 C.  Oh well, it was nice while it lasted.  Guess I will still have crocus open in may afterall!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Nice order, Todd.   I don't have any experience with Arnebia but am hopeful... I got some germination from Arnebia densiflora so will be giving it a try.  Have you or anyone else here tried Arnebia before?  
(Also, I got good germination from a bonus packet of seeds from Pavelka that was labelled as "Arnebia kansuensis"... as the plants are completely different from what seems to be the real arnebia, I'm wondering what the heck it is.  Maybe an Asperula?  I should post photos and see if anyone can figure it out.)  
I'm trying to grow Moltkia aurea from seed, but there was no germination after a considerable length of time, so it went outdoors with some other reluctant ones, to see if that turns it around.

We will be putting in another tufa bed this spring, but I need to restrain myself from ordering anything, as I have a mess of seedlings to try out... which will have to go into the new tufa bed, mostly.  I hope to get rid of some excess seedlings at the CRAGS (Calgary Rock and Alpine Garden Society - NARGS affiliate) plant sale in May... and must remember not to buy plants with my usual lack of restraint.  Beaver Creek Greenhouses always takes part in the plant sale, as do local growers and members, so it will take all my willpower to hold off! 

Hoy wrote:

Do you know how many plants you have totally?

Yes, I have a reasonably good idea of the species count... pending what turns out to be hardy from each year's trials.  (I grow quite a number of things, but, I admit, most not terribly well, LOL!)  

1) Okay, if you hunker down... and squint.... you might be able to make out this miniscule Paraquilegia microphylla, just emerging in the tufa bed, from a seedling that I bought and planted last year.  It's only millimeters across, but I'm glad to see it!
2) Euphorbia myrsinites, in bloom.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

1) Heretofore only the common Anemone nemorosa has started blooming. However, today is calm and warm (for us) so I think A. ranunculoides will open later in the afternoon.
2) Although Impatiens glandulifera is a common pest plant here I like the genus and have some perennials not only for their special flowers but foliage too.
3) One of the first peonies to flower is P. mairei.
4) Soldanella montana preparing to bloom

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Skulski wrote:

1, 2)  Yes, Lathyrus vernus 'Gracilis' does have very narrow leaves.
3, 4) Here, too, is my Allium obliquum ... no problem saving seeds for you, if you want some.  It is very tall - about 3' or more.

Mark, your Baptisia sphaerocarpa and Cynanchum ascyrifolium look and sound very interesting, and completely unfamiliar to me.  Can you show us more pix of them?

Lori, thanks for the pics of the ones I asked about.  The Lathyrus is sweet little thing, nice! And yes please on A. obliquum seed some time.

Here are two photos of Cynanchum ascyrifolium.  This was given to me about 8-9 years ago, I had no idea what it was, and it have become one of my top 10 perennials.  It is so well behaved, flowering for many weeks on end with a profusion of clear white starry flowers, and then if given a trim after flowering, it'll flower again later in the summer.  Initially like a globe in growth, to 18", it can open up a bit during the season, and the ends of the shoots are weakly twining.  It has never made seed, not for me, and not for others that have grown it, so it appears that it needs to be vegetatively propagated.  The surprising thing is that the large genus Cynanchum, contains many ugly species and noxious weeds found throughout the world, so it is interesting to have this charming well-behaved non-seeding species.

As for Baptisia sphaerocarpa, I couldn't find my photos of it (I have an amazing amount of photos over the past 10 years, sadly most are still just default alphanumerically named >:(), so I include a link to the Baptisia page at Plant Delights Nursery:
http://www.plantdelights.com/Tony/baptisia.html
Like most Baptisia, this is a "big boy", not overally tall but spready, and with wide-reaching foliage that can smother adjacent plants.... these things just need lots of room.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

1) Heretofore only the common Anemone nemorosa has started blooming. However, today is calm and warm (for us) so I think A. ranunculoides will open later in the afternoon.
2) Although Impatiens glandulifera is a common pest plant here I like the genus and have some perennials not only for their special flowers but foliage too.
3) One of the first peonies to flower is P. mairei.
4) Soldanella montana preparing to bloom

Trond, P. mairei is new to me, what is it like?  Look at all those buds on Soldanella... slugs don't go after them?  I too like Impatiens, including the common tall weedy one here, Orange Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis).  But as a group, many of the tropic species are becoming tres chic plants for unusual annual displays, such as the sapphire jewelweed, Impatiens namchabarwensis. http://www.finegardening.com/plantguide/impatiens-namchabarwensis-sapphi...

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

Trond, P. mairei is new to me, what is it like?  Look at all those buds on Soldanella... slugs don't go after them?  I too like Impatiens, including the common tall weedy one here, Orange Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis).  But as a group, many of the tropic species are becoming tres chic plants for unusual annual displays, such as the sapphire jewelweed, Impatiens namchabarwensis. http://www.finegardening.com/plantguide/impatiens-namchabarwensis-sapphi...

I thought I had pictures of P. mairei but found none. I have different plants, some bought from Glendoick Garden, Scotland. Here's a picture:
http://www.glendoick.com/onlinecat/showpic.php?pic=paeonea%20mairei.jpg
My plants have a deeper red color. They flower among the first peonies here. I'll take pictures as soon as possible. They are easy to please and I grow some in morning sun and some in evening sun and in different soil.

I have tried to sow I. namchabarwensis but no luck! The Orange Jewelweed looks interesting . We have a similar one here (more common along the fjords further inland) namely the yellow I. noli-tangere.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Impatiens namchabarwensis seeds don't seem to be as "jump in your face" germinators as other impatiens.  I read somewhere that this species grows tubers, so I dug mine up after the first frost last fall, and brought it inside.  Didn't see any thick structures in the root system, but potted it up anyway.  The plant never revived, but a couple seeds did sprout in the pot.

It is also a reluctant seed setter too, at least for me.  The bees love it, but pods  are hardly ever produced in relation to the number of flowers.  I resorted to hand pollinating with a paint brush.  Not sure if it helped any.  This spring will be first season that volunteers might emerge.  We'll see.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

So, you have it, Rick! From seed? When I finally get it I will try some outside in winter, they are supposed to be root hardy.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Yes, from seed.  I have a trade list on Garden Web.  It is all with Latin names, so the people who look at it and find something they want, often have some unusual things too.  Such was how I secured this impatiens seed.  She said germination was low, so she sent me at least a hundred seeds.  She said she seemed to have best luck with sprouting seed direct sowed outside in the fall, but I did get a couple to germinate inside.

Impatiens glandulifera(or glandulosa(?)) and Impatiens balfourii are sprouting now in the garden, but I don't see any namchabarwensis yet, or maybe you can't tell until the true leaves emerge.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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