Signs of life

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

That's a deal!
I have other Cardamines too: pentaphyllos, heptaphylla, trifoliata, bulbifera etc. C. pratensis is very common in the wet fields around here.

Not mentioned in your list, but shown as one of your photos is C. waldsteinii... that one looks awesome... such large flowers.  Yes please to seed on that one, if you get seed... and the only other one I grow currently is pentaphylla, but I'm always looking to increase my Cardamine representation. :D

Regards,

Mark

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

]
Not mentioned in your list, but shown as one of your photos is C. waldsteinii... that one looks awesome... such large flowers.  Yes please to seed on that one, if you get seed... and the only other one I grow currently is pentaphylla, but I'm always looking to increase my Cardamine representation. :D

Regards,

Mark

waldsteinii is the etc part of the list!
I shall collect all the seeds I can! Heptaphylla is almost as nice as waldsteinii.

Trond

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

My mistake Mark....P. montana is the old name for P. rubra...time I got up to speed with the new (or not so new) names.

Trond I'm jealous of your Cardamine...I've never had any luck with the couple I tried (probably too much overcrowding) and access to them is difficult in Canada.  Save some seed for me too!  I'd like to give them a try again.

The worse plant in my garden is probably M. cambrica...hard to get rid of the little blighters.  If the plant didn't have such a long blooming season I'd irradicate it altogether.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

In our Big Woods ecosystem, the wild garlic (Allium tricoccum) and Dicentra cucullaria have been up for a while now.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Cardamine laciniata just beginning.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori,
Pulmonaria altaica is a species I not have seen before. Looks great with huge blue flowers! I have not tried Helleborus cyclophyllus  assuming it wouldn't tolerate wet winters. And this Leptodactylon of yours looks spiny! Haven't seen that either.

Rick,
I have seen Cardamine laciniata pictured but not live, looks nice.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Apparently, Cardamine laciniata is quite variable.  The pic I took is of our wild phenotype in the Minneapolis, Minnesota area.  It blooms very sparsely and the flowers don't open very wide at all.  Like all (or most?) variations of this species, flowers open only when it is warm and sunny.

I have seen photos of much better forms from other parts of the country. So if you look for plants or seed, I would try to stay away from a Minnesota source.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Some more signs of life 2010:

1.  Allium altyncolicum - allied to chives (A. scheoneoprasum) but with spikey erect blue leaves.  Love it!

2.  Allium hymenorrhizum - robust form, beautiful Christmas red stem bases with falcate green leaves. To 30" tall.

3.  Clematis fremontii - a weird relic, reliable but impossibly slow growing.  Fuzzy urn flower(s).

4.  Anemomopsis macrophylla - just sprouted today, in one day, a remarkably beautiful plant in flower.

5.  Aster (now Ionactis) linariifolius - tiny dense shoots; ouch, watch out for the tough old stems. Rock garden gem. Variable.

6.  Paeonia wittmanniana - shoots, a muscular species with single cream-yellow flowers, a large beauty.

7.  Paeonia 'Buckeye Belle' - wow, can you say RED... red shoots but the amazing flowers are glossy deep blood red.

8.  Saxifraga fortunei - pink form, flowers in October with beautiful delicate pale pink flowers, a woodland gem.

9.  Thalictrum minus 'Adiantifolium' - a treasured plant here, filiform masses of tiny yellowish flowers.

10. Saruma henryi - an anagram of the related Asarum, furry foliage and showy yellow flowers, love this plant!

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Some more signs of life 2010 continued - those with asparagus shoots ;-)

11. Amsonia rigida - one of the most consise Amsonia species from southeastern USA, a great perennial.

12. Baptisia sphaerocarpa - bold spires of yellow against blue-green foliage.

13. Cynanchum ascyrifolium - my absolute favotite asclepid perennial, long season of white flowers, concise.

14. Kirengoshoma palmatum - wonderful late summer show of large yellow bells, great foliage too... needs WATER!

15. Uvularia_grandiflora - an essential woodland garden plant, fab foliage, erect then drooping habit, large yellow flowers.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

According to the TV-news here New York has beaten all time high for April temperature? Is this true for your place too, Mark? No wonder why your plants grow fast. Here we will have sun the coming week but the air is a little colder (from the Arctic) so we probably get frosty nights. I'll take some pictures later today.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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