Seed starting chronicles 2012

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Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Oh what dreams are made of if you could grow the Anarthrophyllum! I did try this once from John Watson's seed, but like a lot of South Americans the seedlings became very drawn and out of character (I think you need to put a UV lamp over it!). I am really attracted, like Anne Spiegel, by dwarf legumes, and the adesmias are another group that would be exciting to grow. There are also some excellent South American lupins and one we grew back in the 1990's was L. oreophilus, which I have seen again recently on the Chile Flora site. This grew well in the garden but like most lupins (well all) was relatively short lived. Unfortunately I only have slides from the dark ages of film!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I once germinated Anarthrophyllum desideratum, a single seedling that lasted about 1 month, huzzah.  Lori, I hope you have better success than I, one of the more amazing plants on this earth.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Globularia trichosantha - uniformly germinated in 9 days at room temperature.  This was my third try with this species, each from a different source.  The first two times (other years) they were winter sowed without any success.  They might have been bad seed, I suppose, but more likely rotted over the winter.  These first two batches were seed lightly pressed into the soil surface, then covered with #2 granite grit.  In the third try with the same soil mix, seed was sown on a bed of #1 granite grit, and covered with the #2 grit, and put directly into 68-70F temperature (not winter sown).
             

I received Eranthis hymenalis seed from Wim last year.  He sent me some in moist packing and some dry seed in May, so the dry seed couldn't have dried that long, I would think.  They were promptly planted 11 May 2011 in pots and left outside.  With the crazily warm temps here (a week of 70-79F days and 55-60F nights) both lots came up simultaneously 16 March 2012.  
             

Oxytropis nana - germinated at room temperature in 2 days after scarification and 2 hour soak.  It was quite amazing how quickly they absorbed water.  In the 2 hours it seemed like they doubled in size, but in reality they increased in size by about 50%.

I did a second trial at room temperature with an equal number of seed from the same batch (NARGS Seed Ex seed wild collected in Wyoming) unscarified and not soaked.  One seed emerged in 35 days, so far.
             

I am a bit puzzled by this one: it's supposed to be Oxytropis campestris.  Scarified, and germinated in 7 days at room temperature.  It looks like a monocot to me.  Oxytropis is a dicot.  Any ideas?
             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Rick, it is a dicot and a Fabaceae. The pea (cotyledons) often remains in the soil. But I can't tell if it is an Oxytropis ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Rick, I agree with Trond, it does look like a Fabaceae to me, almost Lathyrus-like, but some Oxytropes and Astragali have upright growth, such as O. campestris, so it might be right.  Here's a photo, its a lovely locoweed.
http://www.em.ca/garden/native/nat_oxytropis_campestris.html

We too have had a full week of record breaking warm weather 75 F - 83 F resulting in a sudden explosion of rapid plant growth and flowering, full bore flowering of Magnolias, cherries, daffodils, everything!  Seed flats that I leave out all winter are bursting with germination, flats of Jeffersonia dubia and diphylla coming up so thick that the soil and mulch top dressing lifts up like a lid.  First time ever getting good germination on Anemonopsis, very happy about that.  Epimedium seed coming up thickly too, both those that I've sown, and innumerable self-sown ones out in the garden.

But as expected with such mild winter weather overall, followed by a heat wave of sorts, cold is returning with a deep freeze predicted for tomorrow night, 19 F (-7 C), followed by several more nights of hard freezing.  I'm not sure how the seedlings will withstand a sudden drop to 19 F, so I'm not taking chances with my flats and brought them indoors for a few days until temperatures moderate, I don't want to risk the bonanza of Anemonopsis, Jeffersonia, and Epimedium seedlings.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Updates:

Thlaspi bellidifolium; Microula tibetica ssp. pratensis; Rheum delavayi; Acantholimon saxifragiforme; Fumana procumbens:

       

Smelowskia calycina; Trachelium rumeliancum; Achillea gypsicola; Ebenus pisidica; Cancrinia tianshanica:

       

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

More updates:

Marrubium lutescens; Anaphalis cf. monocephala (a couple of these are producing flower buds!); Leontopodium cf. pusilum;  Sideritis clandestina; Plantago urvillei:

       

Saussurea nupuripoensis; Tibetia tongolensis; Amorpha canescens; Leontopodium muscoideum; Achillea holosericea:
       

Some photos:
Achillea holosericea:
http://www.greekmountainflora.info/Timfristos/slides/Achillea%20holoseri...

Leontopodium pusilum:
http://botany.si.edu/tibet/photo_gallery.cfm?start=80

Tibetia tongolensis:
http://www.jansalpines.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=13924

Plantago urvillei:
http://www.flora.crimea.ua/podorognik/Plantago-urvillei.jpg

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori, what do you give your speedy seedlings?
They're out of the diapers in no time :o

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Well, nothing but fast-draining soil, really.  I've only given them a bit of fertilizer in the water once recently for the first time.  
We'll be getting ready to put them on the cart to start spending their days outdoors soon (wheeled into the garage at night)... I'm out of room inside here now, so planting more seedlings into individual pots will depend on creating more room this way!

I shouldn't keep so many seedlings of each kind I guess, but I hate to kill them, despite that I know I'll end up giving lots away (or perhaps I should admit to forcing them on people  ;) ) just to get rid of them... wish I could send you all some!  I do try to flog them at the local rock garden society spring plant sale, but it seems that most people are extremely unlikely to even consider trying an unfamiliar species.  (I'm the opposite, evidently!)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

AmyO
AmyO's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-06

Lori...You do grow some obscure (well to me they are) species!  ??? Loads of which I have never heard of. But you are doing an amazing job of germinating and growing on!

Amy Olmsted
Hubbardton, VT, Zone 4

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