Re: Got the Blues

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Very nice, especially the iris!  What was the ACE expedition?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I'm reluctant to admit this, but after several years growing a couple Iris from seed, both species mentioned, including the ACE I. bulleyana, I just dug them up and threw them out.  Although looking at Todd's fine hybrid, perhaps I was rash in this decision.  But for me, the foliage-to-flower ratio was way too high on the foliage side, lots of big and messy foliage, retreating into greater semi-dormancy drying leaf messiness after flowering, and only a few less-than-exciting flowers.  Maybe they didn't like my climate or garden assignment too well, but they are history here now.  I'm going to stick with the small Iris.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

This plant has a rather brief bloom (for me), and to be honest, really doesn't have a whole lot in its favour (again, IMO)... except for these gorgeously blue flowers!
Lindelofia anchusoides...

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Have you christened your pretty iris cross, Todd?

Mark, I am always reluctant to remove any plants. Even some weeds like annual geraniums and perennial Sonchus let I live - for some time. Yesterday we removed hoards of Galium aparine (seems to have many common names?) that I had left too long. (I like the leaves of that one!)

Lindelofia anchusoides, brief bloom or not, really has blue flowers!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Lori the ACE expedition was an American seed collection trip made to China sometime in the late 1990's.  Left-over seed were offered in the NARGS seed exchange.  A local member got 2 lovely Arisaema from that collection although she has yet to ID them.  I got I. bulleyana and a Spirea, the latter which is blooming for the first time this year.

Mark, the bulleyana I got is quite small.....only 45 cm tall with sparse foliage.  My hybrid is quite leafy but blooms are not shy!  It was my first cross done while working at the BG.  I have since created 25 or more hybrids, mostly sino-siberians which do very well in our climate.  I'll aim to get whole plant shots in the next week...right now I have only closeups.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Yeah, veronicas are good for splashes of blue (and purple):
1) Veronica thymoides ssp. pseudocinerea, now done blooming.
2) Trying to get arty... Veronica liwanensis x pectinata 'Reavis' and Alyssum tortuosum (or is it A. stribnyi?)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Todd wrote:

Lori the ACE expedition was an American seed collection trip made to China sometime in the late 1990's.  Left-over seed were offered in the NARGS seed exchange.

Just a gentle correction Todd ... the ACE Expedition was organized by the Alpine Garden Society and visited China in 1994.  Surplus seed was subsequently offered to exchanges around the world.   There were a number of excellent introductions from the original seed.

http://www.alpinegardensociety.net/news/The+AGS+Expedition+to+China+Anni...

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

If I remember correctly, NARGS bought shares in the ACE expedition which gave them a percentage of the original seed disbursement. I don't think it was "leftover seed" since they were subscribers. They may also have come into some leftover seed, I don't recall.  I do remember our seed lot including wonderful androsaces and Chesneyas, unfortunately renamed Spongiocarpella and who knows what it's called now. At any rate, they were gorgeous peas from high screes.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Anne, on that note... and if you don't mind me asking... and diverting for a moment from the subject at hand...

I was asked a while back by an extremely accomplished local alpine gardener to inquire as to what conditions are required for growing Chesneya (formerly Gueldenstaedtia) to beyond the first leaf stage, or preferably, to flowering?

Would you happen to have any advice?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

I believe you are right Anne ... subscriptions were taken for the original expedition.  Todd mentioned the 'late 1990's', so I presumed he was referring to a subsequent distribution or garden seed produced from an original collection?

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

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