New Zealand Alpine Flora

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David L
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-01-31

Hoy wrote:

I have tried to sow the shrubby violet Melicytus twice but never achieved germination. Any advice?

Dave Toole requested that I answer this question so I have just gone through the process of signing up to this forum. Melicytus alpinus is quite a complex entity comprising up to about 20 different forms All forms can be grown from cuttings or from seed. However seed takes a year to germinate, (virtually to the day!) For anyone who is interested here is a link to a presentation on some of the work done by myself and my colleagues from the University of Otago on the Melicytus alpinus complex given at the Southern Connections Confernce here in Dunedin last week. It may be too much information for some!

https://dl.dropbox.com/u/79474488/Orlovich_Southern_Radiations_NEW.pptx

(Moderator: to help gauge download time, the PPTX file is 30.7 MB in size)

David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Magical pictures! There just has to be a Natural History programme made about these plants sometime. I wonder how many gardeners have any idea how beautiful these mountain buttercups are?

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

David wrote:

Hoy wrote:

I have tried to sow the shrubby violet Melicytus twice but never achieved germination. Any advice?

Dave Toole requested that I answer this question so I have just gone through the process of signing up to this forum. Melicytus alpinus is quite a complex entity comprising up to about 20 different forms All forms can be grown from cuttings or from seed. However seed takes a year to germinate, (virtually to the day!) For anyone who is interested here is a link to a presentation on some of the work done by myself and my colleagues from the University of Otago on the Melicytus alpinus complex given at the Southern Connections Confernce here in Dunedin last week. It may be too much information for some!

https://dl.dropbox.com/u/79474488/Orlovich_Southern_Radiations_NEW.pptx

Thank you David! I read through your presentation with great interest! Didn't know that this genus consisted of so many forms.
Had been interesting to try cuttings but that isn't easy to get hold of!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Dave and Steve, thank you for the photos. They are great!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Welcome to the NARGS Forum, David ... your contributions will be eagerly and regularly sought.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

David L
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-01-31

Thanks Cliff, I have several hundred photos taken over the past couple of months to catalogue before I consider posting  but in the meantime Steve and Dave seem to be doing an admirable job showing the NZ flora on the forum.

David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hello David, welcome to NARGS Forum, I recognized your name instantly from SRGC Forum when I saw the registration request awaiting approval :-)

I'll second the endorsement of what a fine job Steve and Dave are doing posting so many images of remarkable NZ native flora and scenery. I keep revisiting these pages to get my fill of astounding Ranunculus species, Celmisias, Raoulias, Aciphylla, and other diverse (even strange, in the case of Melicytus) genera.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

David L
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-01-31

Hello Mark, Thanks for the welcome; I will try an experimental posting.

Here are some pictures of Myosotis pulvinaris taken on the Old Man Range in December. This a small cushion species that grows on bare, very exposed sites on the crest of the range.

       

Some plants flower so profusely the foliage is entirely hiddden.

     

A close up shows the detail of the flowers and the hairs on the leaves. Note the anthers are  more or less below the level of the corolla scales in this species.

     

David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Beautiful - and very different from all Myosotis here!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

A true jewel that Myosotis is, the quintessential alpine cushion. This topic has shown quite a variety of stunning Myosotis species, it seems NZ is a hub of diversity for the genus (particularly thinking back on Myosotis arnoldii).
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=374.msg21134#msg21134).

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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