New Zealand Alpine Flora

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Toole
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Joined: 2010-07-02

Gorse ,(Ulex europaeus ), a spine bearing, nitrogen fixing bush.--an introduced ,terrible weed here .  :(

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

:(

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Wow, that gorse really is terribly invasive.  It seems to have really taken over.  Do people even try to curb its appetite at all?

Love the landscape shots even more.  They really give a feel for the area. 

Clematis afoliata, is sure an odd one, especially since I noticed a "tendril" at the lower left of the closer, second photo.  A clematis with tedrils?  Well, a web searched revealed that the species has "Lvs reduced to petioles and petiolules", so that's explainable.  Also interesting is that the species has unisexual flowers, but apparently(?) it is not dioecious.  I could only see male flowers in the pic...
Would anyone like to shed some clarification here?  Are there other clematis species like this?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Very interesting Dave, as always though! If you ever manage saving enough Celmisia hookeri seed, please ....... ;)
The Olearia is also an interesting gardenworthy plant. It's a pity all the nice plants are so hard to come by here in Norway!

Was the gorse introduced as a useful agricultural plant or is it just a garden escape?

Rick, according to Christopher Grey-Wilson (Clematis the genus) Clematis afoliata is unique although seedlings do have small ordinary laves the first years. It seems that all species in section Novae-Zeelandiae are dioecious. There are a couple other similar but a little leafier species in the same section NZ: C. marata, quadribracteolata; and the very leafy C. forsteri. The beautiful C. paniculata is in the same section.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Toole
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

RickR wrote:

Wow, that gorse really is terribly invasive.  It seems to have really taken over.  Do people even try to curb its appetite at all?

Hoy wrote:

Very interesting Dave, as always though! If you ever manage saving enough Celmisia hookeri seed, please ....... ;)
The Olearia is also an interesting gardenworthy plant. It's a pity all the nice plants are so hard to come by here in Norway!

Was the gorse introduced as a useful agricultural plant or is it just a garden escape?

Hello Rick/Hoy

Yes there is control taken.

Each Regional council is responsible for administering a Regional Pest Management Strategy under the Biosecurity Act and enforcing the rules pertaining to this . I'm not sure of the rules surrounding gorse ,either boundary clearance or total control.

It is seen as having some value --pollen for bees , stabilising eroding ground, fixing nitrogen in the soil and providing a nursery bed for regenerating native forests,(the shade of which eventually kills the gorse--still a real hassle though when i go pig hunting with my brother --the gorse while dead ,takes a long time to collapse to the ground so it's matter of bashing through wearing protective clothing and a good pair of gloves).

Guess this is a reminder of what can happen when a foreigner is introduced ,(originally as a hedging plant),into a favourable climate where there are a lack of biological predators.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Steve Newall
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Title: Member
Joined: 2011-08-23

Went back to the Mt.Cook area last weekend to look at some upcoming work and managed to sneak off for the morning and revisit the areas from our previous trip 2 weeks earlier . I was particularly interested in finding flowers on Celmisia bellidioides ( which had been in bud ) and also having another look for Dave's hybrid ( Ranunculus tooliei )

I would appreciate any feedback on placing names on the pictures . I hope it doesn't clutter anything . Firstly , some Anisotomes from "Anisotome Valley "

The one and only flower that was open on the C.bellidioides , so I guess early December probably a better time for pictures

The new bridge across the Hooker River is nearly finished

The view from inside Stocking Creek shelter

Lots of Mt.Cook lilies were flowering . Actually thousands were but tens of thousands were not which is probably why we cannot find Dave's hybrid again . It's resting and waiting for its turn again

Mt.Sefton

Even the Pittosporums are divaricating shrubs here

(Moderator:  added plant names for forum searches; Anisotome haastii, Anisotome pilifera, Gingidia montana, Celmisia bellidioides, Ranunculus lyallii, Gaultheria crassa, Pittosporum anomalum)

Balclutha , New Zealand

Howey
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-05-17

Dave - interesting to read of the  problems you are having with gorse in New Zealand.  It has also been introduced to Vancouver Island, BC and is a terrible pest there too - in fact I hear groups of local volunteers periodically take forays out to try to get rid of it - hmm.  Guess, as you point out, there is a good side to it - attracts bees and helps prevent soil erosion.  Think we used to call it Broom and I thought it originated in the British Isles (Scotland)?  Fran

Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b

Howey
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-05-17

Jandals - Didn't know a plant, which is not normally divericate, could become so.  At the Dunedin Botanic Garden, there is a Divericate border which highlights naturally divericate plants.  If a Pittasporum can become divericate, would that be caused by a "spartan" diet or something special either present or lacking in the soil.  Just wondering.  Fran

Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Steve - I don't think I can imagine a more beautiful plant than that Ranunculus! And the view from the mountain cabin...

I've just been reading about Capt. Cook's voyages to the southern seas and get some idea of what it must have been like to first see some of those landscapes and plants. Different when you live there I suppose...

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

Great pics Steve.

Howey wrote:

Dave - interesting to read of the  problems you are having with gorse in New Zealand.  It has also been introduced to Vancouver Island, BC and is a terrible pest there too - in fact I hear groups of local volunteers periodically take forays out to try to get rid of it - hmm.  Guess, as you point out, there is a good side to it - attracts bees and helps prevent soil erosion.  Think we used to call it Broom and I thought it originated in the British Isles (Scotland)?  Fran

Hello Fran
Broom ,(Cytisus scoparius), unfortunately has been introduced here as well and is classed as a pest also.
Both were probably introduced from the UK by the early settlers.

I'm not a supporter of either at all.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

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