Miscellaneous Woodlanders

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Allison
Allison's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-04-08

I've had mixed results with cuttings. In 2009 I took 18 cuttings from plants growing in woods nearby. I stuck them into acidic sand collected near where the plants were. By late fall all had rooted and were showing some new leaves. I left them in the flat over winter ( in an improvised cold frame which collapsed on them) and in the spring gave some away and transplanted the rest to my garden. Six or so plants now seem well established and have lots of buds right now.

In 2010, thinking I knew how to do this, I got another 12 cuttings and did the same thing as before: small cuttings, stuck into acidic sand, covered with a plastic dome and kept in the shade all summer..... and they all stayed green but did not root and in the spring they all died.

Last summer I tried putting the cuttings into peat moss as described in H. Lincoln Foster's book. They died quickly. This summer I hope to try the sand approach again.

I've never gotten any seeds to germinate. The seedlings are so tiny maybe I just didn't see them but in any case none got big enough to stand up and be counted.

It must depend on getting the cuttings at the right time. Foster suggests early June, which is what I did, but of course every year is different so what does that mean.

Gardening on a wooded rocky ridge in the Ottawa Valley, Canada. Cold winters (-30C) and hot, humid summers. Nuts about native plants, ferns, pottery, my family, and Border Collies.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Lis wrote:

It must depend on getting the cuttings at the right time.

Michael Dirr says in his propagation book that August into September (I assume in Georgia) is the best time to take cuttings of Trailing Arbutus.  ("Mayflowers" denote Thalictrum thalictroides were I live.)  Untreated in sand/peat mix gave 94% rooting in 5 weeks.  Cuttings include part of last season's growth.  October cutting rooted at 50%.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I prefere cuttings to tiny seeds :-\ ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

That primula would make a great time lapse film! I've had thoughts of doing this on beds in the garden but so far haven't built up the resolve - it needs a bit of planning. Fern fronds expanding, Jeffersonia coming in and going out of flower (or Sanguinaria); in both cases it is only a few days. With Giant Fennels you can virtually watch the flower spike growing! I'm convincing myself that this would make a good project.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Tim wrote:

That primula would make a great time lapse film! I've had thoughts of doing this on beds in the garden but so far haven't built up the resolve - it needs a bit of planning. Fern fronds expanding, Jeffersonia coming in and going out of flower (or Sanguinaria); in both cases it is only a few days. With Giant Fennels you can virtually watch the flower spike growing! I'm convincing myself that this would make a good project.

I have always wanted to do a time lapse photography of Arisaema heterophyllum (the form I grow is a giant, reaches 6' (2 m) to the spathe tip), typically it doesn't emerge until late May or early June, then in the span of 3 weeks it reaches 6 feet!

Thinking about time-lapse photography, in notheastern USA we've had a full week of record breaking mid-summer like warmth, each day to 79-80 F, people going around dressed in shorts and tee shirts.  As if by magic, everything starting popping open; Magnolia soulangiana trees (widely planted here) are in full bloom, as are M. stellata and salicifolia, Forsythia, Cornus mas, Rhododendron mucronulatum, daffodils, and everything else pushing rapid growth.  Suddenly Jeffersonia dubia is in bloom, the plants looking foreshortened and not flowering normally.  Predicted to go down to 19 F (-7 C) tomorrow night, below freezing the following night(s) too; I anticipate the level of freeze damage that will occur with so much soft and advanced spring plant growth.

Mayflower or Trainling Arbutus, Epigaea repens is in bloom, now in New England we must call these Marchflower ;)  Here are a couple photos taken near dusk on my way home from work a couple days ago.  It's a near white form, I did take a photo of a single deeper pink form, but it came out blurry.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Mark, white or pink, March or Mayflower; it is a gem!

McDonough wrote:

Thinking about time-lapse photography, in notheastern USA we've had a full week of record breaking mid-summer like warmth, each day to 79-80 F, people going around dressed in shorts and tee shirts.  As if by magic, everything starting popping open; Magnolia soulangiana trees (widely planted here) are in full bloom, as are M. stellata and salicifolia, Forsythia, Cornus mas, Rhododendron mucronulatum, daffodils, and everything else pushing rapid growth.  Suddenly Jeffersonia dubia is in bloom, the plants looking foreshortened and not flowering normally.  Predicted to go down to 19 F (-7 C) tomorrow night, below freezing the following night(s) too; I anticipate the level of freeze damage that will occur with so much soft and advanced spring plant growth.

Although we have had nice sunny weather we haven't reached that warm temperatures! Neither do we get freezing nights either :)
In the eastern part of Norway they have had all time high temperatures in March and my sister in Oslo tells  she'll have flowering daffodils in the garden before Easter for the first time ever!

Mark, are you sure it is an Arisaema and not a bamboo you grow?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Some plants which are flowering here now in the shade-garden.

Hepatica transsilvanica 'Eisvögel'
Hepatica nobilis
(white)
Hepatica nobilis (blue)
Adonis ramosa
Thalictrum thalictroides 'Amelia'
Thalictrum thalictroides 'Big'
and Primula 'Cowichan Red'

Forgot a few  :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

Hepatica x media 'Blue Jewel'
and Thalictrum thalictroides 'Pink Flash'

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Nice stuff, Wim!
I'm jealous of your different T thalictroides cultivars. Have tried to establish some here with little success :(

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Wim- many nice things in flower there, as always!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Hoy wrote:

Nice stuff, Wim!
I'm jealous of your different T thalictroides cultivars. Have tried to establish some here with little success :(

Thanks, Trond. Really weird that the T. thalictroides (Anemonella) doesn't grow at your place....maybe to cold in winter?? Would you like to try again?

cohan wrote:

Wim- many nice things in flower there, as always!

Thanks Cohan!

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

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