Miscellaneous spring bulbs

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Really cool stuff Mark.  The hairs are certainly an added attraction on the last one for me. 
What conditions are your Colchicums growing in?

Nothing special in terms of growing conditions, I typically excavate a 6" deep hole, and amend the our native rocky silty-clay soil with about 50% sand.

I went back and found a few photos from 2010, the photo on the left showing that the bulbs I received represent two forms, one only sparingly hairy but with larger more abundant light pink flowers, and one that is very hairy, with smaller less abundant deeper pink flowers.  I like them both.  The next two photos show the hairy foliage.

Colchicum doerfleri

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

WimB
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Joined: 2011-01-31

Wonderful Colchicums, Mark. Here they are all in leaf now as they flowered in February. Love C. doerfleri a lot...I'll have to find that species.

Here in flower now:

Corydalis bracteata
Corydalis shanginii subsp. ainae
Erythronium dens-canis 'Charmer'
Hyacinthella dalmatica
Ranunculus ficaria 'Greenpetal'
Ranunculus ficaria 'Ken Aslett'
And some Narcissus cultivars.

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Really good stuff Wim, nice Corydalis, and others, we hope to get a hint of such things in the weeks to come.  I have a friend that is enthusiastic about some well-behaved forms of Ranunculus ficaria.  Ranunculus ficaria 'Greenpetal' certainly looks intriguing close-up.  Does it have any visual impact in the garden, or is it one of those collectors "BIO plants" (an acronym borrowed from George Schenk, meaning Botanical Interest Only).  I rather like this green-flowered Ranunculus, but wonder what the whole plant looks like from afar.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

WimB
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

McDonough wrote:

Really good stuff Wim, nice Corydalis, and others, we hope to get a hint of such things in the weeks to come.  I have a friend that is enthusiastic about some well-behaved forms of Ranunculus ficaria.  Ranunculus ficaria 'Greenpetal' certainly looks intriguing close-up.  Does it have any visual impact in the garden, or is it one of those collectors "BIO plants" (an acronym borrowed from George Schenk, meaning Botanical Interest Only).  I rather like this green-flowered Ranunculus, but wonder what the whole plant looks like from afar.

Thanks Mark,

there are not a lot R. ficaria cultivars which are well behaved in the garden. Except maybe for the sterile doubles which don't seed around so that's one way less in which they can take over the garden. R. ficaria 'Greenpetal' hasn't got a strong visual impact in the garden. You can see in the first pic how the plant as a whole looks, it's "BIO plant"  ;) (Although I must mention that I planted this cultivar this year so it might get bigger and more distinct in the following years)
The second pic is of R. ficaria 'Salad Bowl' which is one of the most beautiful cultivars to me.

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

WimB wrote:

Thanks Mark,
there are not a lot R. ficaria cultivars which are well behaved in the garden. Except maybe for the sterile doubles which don't seed around so that's one way less in which they can take over the garden. R. ficaria 'Greenpetal' hasn't got a strong visual impact in the garden. You can see in the first pic how the plant as a whole looks, it's "BIO plant"  ;) (Although I must mention that I planted this cultivar this year so it might get bigger and more distinct in the following years)
The second pic is of R. ficaria 'Salad Bowl' which is one of the most beautiful cultivars to me.

These two R. ficaria cultivars are just "too cool"; love the name 'Salad Bowl' too... I think we'll be seeing StephenB over here with a name like that ;D  Thanks for showing the whole plant; while understated, it has a chartreuse appeal, and the extra crinkly buds add to the effect.  I will send a link to my ficaria-fancier friend, to take a look at these. I wonder what Ranunculus (aka Cliff Booker) thinks of these Rananculus?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-08-27

...and here I am :)

Actually, Ranunculus ficaria does appear occasionally in my "Salad Bowl" these days! Leaves have a good mild flavour, but should only be used raw early in the spring before flowers appear (as it does become mildly toxic later on). I had been sceptical for many years and never tried it, but was persuaded by other foragers telling me that I was missing one of the best spring salad plants in addition to learning that this species has been one of the most common wild gathered edibles in the Mediterranean countries right up to present in mountain villages (used in salads and cooked). It's common name also refers to its edibility in several European languages - including the Norwegian Vaarkaal which means spring cabbage - I think that can be traced back to Linnea who wrote that it was edible.

I visited the Hortus Botanicus in Firenze (Florence) Italy a few years ago - there's  a fantastic collection of wild gathered edibles including Ranunculus ficaria -  you can see the sign below; it says that "stems, leaves and raw tubers, pickled buds, and a few flowers decorating salads are used". However, it also warns not to use when flowering!

Actually, what I was going to ask when I saw this thread was whether anyone had suggestions for hardy cultivars? The common and garden one is pretty hardy, but the other ones I've tried so far haven't made it - Chedglow and Green Petal for example. My quest: the tastiest ficaria cultivar  ;)

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Booker
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

McDonough wrote:

I wonder what Ranunculus (aka Cliff Booker) thinks of these Rananculus?

Oh Mark,
As with politics, religion and untimely death I try to avoid discussions about R. ficaria as they seldom feature on my ranunculus radar in any way.  I adore and covet all the high mountain buttercups (and appreciate and cultivate many of the less demanding species), but rank R. ficaria cultivars about as interesting and worthy of my time as snowdrops, chrysanthemums, dahlias and hyacinths.  (I can hear the murmurings, catcalls and derision from here so I have invested in some earplugs before responding to your query)!   :D

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Booker wrote:

Oh Mark,
...but rank R. ficaria cultivars about as interesting and worthy of my time as snowdrops, chrysanthemums, dahlias and hyacinths.  (I can hear the murmurings, catcalls and derision from here so I have invested in some earplugs before responding to your query)!   :D

Well Cliff, you needn't worry about any derision from me on those, although admission of less than penultimate reverence for snowdrops is a horticultural offense in the UK, isn't it? ;D

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

McDonough wrote:

Booker wrote:

Oh Mark,
...but rank R. ficaria cultivars about as interesting and worthy of my time as snowdrops, chrysanthemums, dahlias and hyacinths.  (I can hear the murmurings, catcalls and derision from here so I have invested in some earplugs before responding to your query)!   :D

Well Cliff, you needn't worry about any derision from me on those, although admission of less than penultimate reverence for snowdrops is a horticultural offense in the UK, isn't it? ;D

Punishable by a lobotomy ... or certainly severe pruning!!!  ;D

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Booker wrote:

McDonough wrote:

I wonder what Ranunculus (aka Cliff Booker) thinks of these Rananculus?

Oh Mark,
As with politics, religion and untimely death I try to avoid discussions about R. ficaria as they seldom feature on my ranunculus radar in any way.  I adore and covet all the high mountain buttercups (and appreciate and cultivate many of the less demanding species), but rank R. ficaria cultivars about as interesting and worthy of my time as snowdrops, chrysanthemums, dahlias and hyacinths.  (I can hear the murmurings, catcalls and derision from here so I have invested in some earplugs before responding to your query)!   :D

;D ;D Cliff, it's a good thing tastes differ....  ;)

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

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