The making of a tufa garden

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Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Peter Korn's website by the way is http://www.peterkornstradgard.se/english/eindex.htm

He grows an extraordinarily wide range of plants with great sensitivity to their ecological requirements. I only wish I was 25 years younger!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

It always goes back to the combination of environmental factors working together.  I agree that tufa would win out in the end over sand, but is not necessarily true all the time.  I remember reading multiple times in Jānis Rukšāns's book Buried Treasure how many bulbous plants he found in situ in Central Asia grew in clay, when the accepted garden culture is "perfectly draining soil".

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

You have to look both at the growing medium and the climate. You can't separate the two. What works in one place doesn't necessarily work another place with a different climate.
The summer temperature is also very important - not only the winter mean and low spells.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

youngman54
youngman54's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-11-04

Stunning!! what a project. Cant wait to see it developing as its planted up. keep the photos coming.

Will Youngman
Comrie Scotland

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I acquired some more tufa on the weekend and put in tufa bed #5... it's not done yet, but the structure is completed.  So I guess I certainly will have room for all the new plants!  :)  The new bed is the differently-coloured one... it's been wet down to pack the planting mix.

 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Looks terrific!
A question, do you get invading moss or lichens in your tufa beds? Such porous rock would be to the liking of moss here.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

And here too, Trond.  I haven't found it to cause a problem although I pick it out when it gets close to some thing that wants dry conditions as well as lime.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Very inspiring, Lori!  8)

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Wonderful work, Lori.  Keep us posted on the planting, please.

Trond, I agree with what you said about climate.  In the American west, you can find many plants growing in heavy clay.  But this soil exists along with 10% humidity and very, very dry little rainfall and intense sun.  That clay dries rock hard.  If you grew the same plants in the same condiitons in the northeast with our average rain fall of 30-40 inches, they plants would not survive, because the clay would be muck all the time.  Ditto the use of pumice in mixes.  Here it would keep the mix much too wet.  Everything has to betailored to your conditions which calls for experimenting with a lot of plants.  (And a large plant cemetary for the failures)

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Lori, re: "gyra rock" (a term new to me, too).  I once heard a lecture about drainage which compared "round" to "angular".  It's true that round gravel drains much faster, but it's difficult to find.  Probably the most superior drainage would come from a pot full of marbles!

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