late season interest?

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Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

We have a few things flowering this late, including Saxifraga fortunei, really a great plant but not too good in our relatively dry garden. The shoots of snowdrops are just appearing through the ground and there is a large collection of these which adds great anticipation to the early weeks of 2012. We are lucky to have such (relatively) mild winters! However, the greatest fun this November has been my daughter's 18th birthday, for which we lit the garden with night lights and consumed quantities of cake and alcohol - a good change from the ongoing 'garden renovations'.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Tim wrote:

. . . and consumed quantities of cake and alcohol - a good change from the ongoing 'garden renovations'.

I prefere cake and coffee, or alcohol (that is red wine) and peanuts, or beer and a pub ;)

However, seems you had a nice evening anyway! Congratulation with your daughter.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

AmyO
AmyO's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-06

Tim wrote:

However, the greatest fun this November has been my daughter's 18th birthday, for which we lit the garden with night lights and consumed quantities of cake and alcohol - a good change from the ongoing 'garden renovations'.

What an interesting and fun-looking cake! Baked with a surprise in it...kind of like the cakes prisoners would get with a hacksaw baked in... ;)

Amy Olmsted
Hubbardton, VT, Zone 4

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

AmyO wrote:

What an interesting and fun-looking cake!

And tasty, no doubt. 

A very enjoyable evening, I'm sure.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

RickR wrote:

Anandria, yes, a slip on my part.  I never have gotten a good close up of the real flower, but here is a blown up one:

Interesting plant-- I think I've come across the name somewhere.. nice fall colour too...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-08-27

RickR wrote:

How very timely, Stephen: just yesterday I was going through the "P" section of leftover seeds from the 2010-2011 Nargs seed ex that our Chapter received.  There is a packet of Patrinia scabiosifolia.  Would you like it?

Many thanks for the Patrinia seed which arrived today!! Let me know if there's anything I can send in return!

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

CScott
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-23

Thank you for the ideas for late season interest in a rock garden.
I am keeping a list and will look for either the plants or seeds.
Caroline

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Nice to see that you are still "lurking" around, Caroline. 

Stop in anytime... ;D

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Michael J Campbell
Michael J Campbell's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Not sure where to post this.

Loasa coccinea ( Caiophora andina)?

This flower might look innocent but each of those hairs can deliver a sting equal to a wasp sting but fortunately the pain does not last quite as long.

Michael J Campbell in Shannon, County Clare, Ireland

http://www.facebook.com/michael.j.campbell.395

Lewisias, alpines ,South African bulbs
http://picasaweb.google.co.uk/michaelJcampbell63

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Michael wrote:

Not sure where to post this.

Loasa coccinea ( Caiophora andina)?

This flower might look innocent but each of those hairs can deliver a sting equal to a wasp sting but fortunately the pain does not last quite as long.

An AWESOME plant Michael!  I too wonder where the species fall, whether it be Loasa of Caiophora, the taxonomy seems to be in flux.  It sounds like you know the stinging effect of touching the plant's bristles first hand.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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