late season interest?

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Harold Peachey
Harold Peachey's picture
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Joined: 2010-03-22

Phemeranthus is quite easy from seed

Harold Peachey
USDA Z5, Onondaga, NY US

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Yes, the genus does seem to be easy germinators, but Somehow, I lost the tag on that seeded pot.  I get volunteers in my potted materials very often.  Usually they need a cold moist period before they sprout at warm temps. 

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Thanks. Something to try, then!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

We don't live far from Christopher Lloyd's famous garden, Great Dixter. Not many alpines in evidence but it is always very dramatic late in the season as these few photos show. Lots of dahlias, begonias and tender perennials. It is a real one off garden centred around one of the most beautiful houses you can imagine! The last picture is taken in the (extra) exotic section of the garden which is more like a jungle; it is a buddleja whose name I forget but I think with vivid orange flowers over that marvellous crimped foliage. It is hard seeing all these plantings to not want to branch out into a more exotic style of gardening, but the garden is very labour intensive and has many volunteer helpers.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

Anandria, yes, a slip on my part.  I never have gotten a good close up of the real flower, but here is a blown up one:

Well, it seems to be named L. anandra in the Russian pages anyway ;)
An interesting plant anyway.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Tim wrote:

The last picture is taken in the (extra) exotic section of the garden which is more like a jungle; it is a buddleja whose name I forget but I think with vivid orange flowers over that marvellous crimped foliage.

Seems to be a form of the North American  Buddleja marrubiifolia.... with VERY good foliage 8)

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

IMYoung wrote:

Tim wrote:

The last picture is taken in the (extra) exotic section of the garden which is more like a jungle; it is a buddleja whose name I forget but I think with vivid orange flowers over that marvellous crimped foliage.

Seems to be a form of the North American  Buddleja marrubiifolia.... with VERY good foliage 8)

That's one I never heard of, so had to look it up.  Here's a page to this Arizona native, a rather handsome thing:
http://ag.arizona.edu/pima/gardening/aridplants/Buddleia_marrubifolia.html

I was at a used bookstore this weekend, and they had a book on the genus Buddleia... wish I had bought it, but with 3 books already selected for purchase I had to limit myself  :(

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I had never recognized that as a Buddleja but I believe you when you say so (and Mark's link shows the flowers too!). Seems to be hardy down to -10C, something for me to try - if I ever get hold of it!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

This is a small shrub which I had never come across before - Leptodermis oblonga. It is native to N. China and grows just to 3 or 4 feet, flowering from July to September (according to Bean, Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the british Isles). The flowers are rather intriguing with lobes at the end of the petals.

The plant came from Robin White at Blackthorn Nursery, and it is reminiscent of the daphnes that he grows so well except with five rather than four petals. It belongs to the Rubiaceae, a huge family with some nice alpine members like Asperula and Galium, and also coffee and quinine! Quite a stimulating family!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Tim, Leptodermis oblonga has become increasingly available over here in the US, showing up in some nursery lists.  I've had a nice little bush of this that I planted about 5-6 years ago, still only about 2' x 2' in size (60 cm x 60 cm), and just this past spring a couple of volunteer seedlings.  It flowers for a long time, and reflowers sporadically all season.  Cute, very hardy small shrub. I believe I got mine from Collector's Nursery, but will have to check my label to be sure.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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