late season interest?

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Trond, nice pics of late blooming stuff; I've always admired Phygelius capesis but don't believe it is hardy here.  Clematis heracleifolia is attractive and looks like something to add to my list.  Good photo of Phuopsis, a genus name that I like saying aloud :D  My phone-camera takes terrible photos in the rain, and its supposed to rain for the next 4 days, so might not get many photogenic scenes to add here.  With all of the rain, I saw a slug today ;)

The native asters are in full force (and I still call them Aster instead of Symphyotrichum), in the following view of a weedy strip in front of a stone wall along the street, is Aster pilosus (the main white-flowered aster), and on the left is Aster ericoides (denser clusters of tiny white flowers arranged in spires), and blue Aster laevis.  All are native here.

Aster laevis is one of the better larger-flowered purple-blue asters; a fairly tall grower it often reclines and with smaller lateral branches gives the illusion of being a smaller growing species. One of the first and last to bloom, with an extended blue time.  They contrast nicely with the brilliant red of Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) which turns color early.

Two views of Aster linariifolius (Ionactis linariifolius), which is seeding around a bit too much, but I do love this species with low twiggy stems, bright green bristly needle-like foliage, and typically light powder blue flowers, but I also have lots of white flowered ones, descendants of white forms I found growing at the town dump many years ago.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I have a love/hate relationship with Hemerocallis.  I dislike many of the overbred cultivars one sees today, with thick lemon-peel petals that are ultra ruffled and heavily frilled, many with gross early-senescent course foliage.  There are of course exceptions; here's one called Hemerocallis 'Autumn Prince' with narrow basal foliage, and a long slender stem and a few small, simple, yellow trumpets, elegant in its simplicity and certainly welcome for its Sept-October bloom period.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

All the rain seems to be putting the garden to bed exceptionally early this year.  There are daphnes reblooming, but that's not that unusual.  After the heat and drought, the excessive rain has forced a lot of plants into growth - hopefully they'll have a chance to harden off before winter.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

And I just got online to post a pic of C. weyrichii !

Not a nice specimen like yours, though, Ann.  No, this pic is to show the tenacity of the species.  I rooted some cuttings of C. weyrichii 'Pink Bomb' back in 2009 in a mix of 3/4 perlite, 1/4 peat.  Some I grew on, but these were left in the original rooting pot.  They have been sitting forgotten in my menagerie of potted plants,in the shade of a Dwarf ninebark.

And even then, they still put on happy faces outside my kitchen window.

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

I have that pink form too. Rick.  Here it blooms first by a week or so.  C. weyrichii just sat and did nothing for a couple of years and then it took off, seeding itself in delightful places.  So nice to have something to look at this time of year.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Leibnitzia anandra anandria has very dark leaves this fall.  
Phemeranthus (Talinum) spp. have nice autumn color.

       

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Rick, when I googled Leibnitzia anandra anandria  I got a lot of hits - in Russian! But when I googled Leibnitzia anandria I got a lot of "normal" hits!?

Anyway, the plant looks good and so does the Phemeranthus. The last one, is it a succulent?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I grew Leibnitzia anandria many years ago when I lived in Seattle, Washington, an oddity to be sure, that's able to create non-flowering flowers in summer that go directly to seed (analogous to cleistogamous seed production in Viola species).  I barely remember the spring flowers, so googled to see what they looked like again.

The Phemeranthus in fall color look like upsidedown squiddies ;D

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Anandria, yes, a slip on my part.  I never have gotten a good close up of the real flower, but here is a blown up one:

             

Hoy wrote:

The last one [Phemeranthus], is it a succulent?

Yes. and deciduous.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Phemeranthus looks nice, is it possible from seed?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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