late season interest?

102 posts / 0 new
Last post
Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

RickR wrote:

Boy, that feathery whatever it is at the base of the petals on that cyanthanthus is really cool!

I think a comparison to this photo from mid-July confirms that that what we are seeing there are indeed... pardon the scientific terminology... what I refer to as "fuzzy bits".  ;D ;D

Thanks for the info on the Euonymus... awaiting updates through time!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Mark sent me some E. planipes seedlings last fall. (Thanks, Mark!)  They weathered the winter just fine in pots and in the ground.  (Remember that rabbits love anything euonymus, though.)  I've not grown E. sachalinensis, but E. hamitonianus var. sieboldianus, E. nanus var. turkestanicus, E. bungeana and E. verrucosus all do well here.  I have a friend in zone 3 that grows E. bungeana.  Though all of these a very nice in their own right, none are like planipes or sachalinensis, in my opinion.

I do not have E. planipes; Rick, what I sent you was E. sachalinensis.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Oops!  I guess I might have discovered my naming error many years from now....
Thanks again, Mark.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

CScott
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-23

:)  Thank you for all the great ideas in this discussion.
I can now make a list of plants to look for next season.
And I will need to think through the idea of early bloomers in warmer climes as later bloomers here.
Caroline

Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-08-27

I also occasionally see a late flowering Pulsatilla in my damp climate.

Re-Patrinias: Having discovered that these are/were commonly wild foraged food plants in Japan and elsewhere in the far east, I've been eagerly trying to make a collection, although they aren't that easy to get hold of. Most successful so far has been this one which I received as Patrinia triloba but I believe it's P. gibbosa (a small plant). P. scabiosifolia seems to have died on me, but P. triloba v. takeucheuma survived the last very hard winter here as small plants, so there's hope. I would be very pleased if anyone can offer seed of other Patrinias....

The P. gibbosa flowers late July early August here.

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

How very timely, Stephen: just yesterday I was going through the "P" section of leftover seeds from the 2010-2011 Nargs seed ex that our Chapter received.  There is a packet of Patrinia scabiosifolia.  Would you like it?

By the way, there are always really good seed selections in the leftover packets of past seed exchanges.  If your chapter doesn't elect to receive a bunch of them, you are missing out!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I have Patrinia ruprestris, and typically get seeds on it, I'll be on the look out for seed for you.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-08-27

Thank you both and a yes please, but no hurry!

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori wrote:

Hoy wrote:

it is very common here that early spring flowering plants have an autumn flowering period too.

Interesting... and enviable.  I was going to attribute the general absence of such behavior here (or, at least, in my yard) to a very short season, but I guess you have a darned short season too.   Maybe the difference is related to climate then?  The end of our season is certainly very final, when everything is frozen off.

A short season? It depends on the weather ;D

Usually the first flowers emerge February and the last ones in December .. .. .. Except the last two years when we had rather cold winters (mid November to mid February).

It is too late for seeds of E planipes, Lori, but I can save some next fall if you want.

By the way, here are some blooming now: Phygelius capesis blooms the whole summer and autumn too while Clematis heracleifolia starts blooming in September and keep going for a moth or two.

   

The Anemone is a common fall flowering one but the Impatiens is an annual similar to I balsamina but more compact (1m) and branched (it is weedy though!) The Daphne is from seed and unknown (it is not what the label said).  However it flowers sparingly all summer and autumn.

 

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Phuopsis stylosa still stays put.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Pages

Log in or register to post comments