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Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

What extraordinarily beautiful veronicas Panayoti. I wish I could grow them like that here but have never managed - I suppose not hot and dry and light enough in the summer or cold enough in the winter. Have just ordered seed of bombycina and thymoides so my optimism is not dimmed!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to all the forum members! Pictured is Oxalis 'Ione Hocker'

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Magnificent oxalis, Todd.

Mark, the Aceriphyllum is to die for ... another to add to that ever expanding list.  :D

(Moderator note:  see split-off topic called "Mukdenia" for references to Aceriphyllum & Mukdenia:)
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=919.0

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Cliff, thanks for your beautiful mountain photos!  I imagine that you, like I, spend the winter looking through them and reliving the wonderful days in the mountains!  I especially love seeing Potentilla nitida.

Your veronicas are gorgeous, Panayoti... the intensity of colour is stunning.  I've had V. thymoides ssp. pseudocinerea in a trough for many years but not performing anywhere near like yours... clearly your conditions are perfect for it.

As I've said before, Todd, your fabulous Oxalis just kill me!  (Whereas, in my conditions here, I kill them...  :'( )

Mukdenia rossii is very seasonal-looking, Mark - a very handsome plant.  Cold zone readers may be pleased to note that it has been hardy here in my garden over many years, so is well worth a try in other cold areas.
(Note:  see split-off topic called "Mukdenia" for references to Aceriphyllum & Mukdenia:)
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=919.0

Here, to brighten a winter day, is a winner from the "seed-starting lottery" of a couple of years ago  (i.e. take a wild gamble on acquiring and growing seeds from plants for which essentially no information is available, and see what happens!  :D):  Hypericum aviculariifolium ssp. uniflorum

(I've shown and talked about this species before but to recap...) I grew this from seed in 2010, and had germination in about 10 days at room temperature (no seed conditioning).  The seedlings were planted out in summer, 2010, and the burst into glorious bloom in 2011.  Seed came from M. Pavelka and was collected at 2500m, Dedegol Dag, Turkey.  I planted all the seedlings out either in crevices between tufa, or on the edges of the tufa garden in tufa gravel (which is where I had room at the time) and they all seem pretty happy, though the plant in the highest part of the tufa mound is best developed.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

MMmmm, I love the look of Hypericum aviculariifolium ssp. uniflorum, and I'm a big fan of Hypericum in general.  There is a caterpiller here that eats and devastates some of the smaller hypericums, not sure what it is, leaving the plants defoliated.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

McDonough wrote:

MMmmm, I love the look of Hypericum aviculariifolium ssp. uniflorum, and I'm a big fan of Hypericum in general.  There is a caterpiller here that eats and devastates some of the smaller hypericums, not sure what it is, leaving the plants defoliated.

I sent seeds to both the NARGS and SRGC seedexes, so there's a chance for people to try it!  I note that the height of the species is shown as "5 - 7.5 cm" in the NARGS seedlist, however, my plants are totally recumbent and only stand about 2 - 3 cm above the ground surface.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Well, once again I missed something good in this year's NARGS seedlist... I blasted through it so quickly, but there were many other plant species that caught my attention, it can always wait until another year, or two, or three. Besides. I need to be more scientific to find out what eats my smaller Hypericums and see what sorts of defences could be employed to prevent defoliation.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Notice: the discussion on Mukdenia has been moved to its own topic, find it in the The NARGS Forum > Plants and Gardens > Woodlanders > Mukdenia topic:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=919.0

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Lori - after seeing your picture earlier on of the Hypericum this is seed I have also ordered from Mojmir Pavelka. Good to hear your experiences with it. I have always liked the smaller hypericums too and remember a good article on the Mediterranean species by Nicholas Turland in the AGS Bulletin many years ago. For a while he distributed seed whilst running Northside Seeds.

Your garden never ceases to amaze me on the Forum. Have you written about it elsewhere? I think Elizabeth Lawrence was right when she wrote that all gardeners eventually aspire to become rock gardeners!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

What! No images of late? I hasten to rectify this sad state of affairs! I am posting a picture of Eustoma grandiflorum I took last August in Fort Collins in an area where there used to be thousands. This year there were only dozens (weather? timing?). Always good to see this extravagant gentian relative that tries to masquerade as a Calochortus or tulip. We're not fooled! If only it were perennial and reliable in the garden!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

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