Image of the day

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Steve Newall
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Title: Member
Joined: 2011-08-23

The lads were out walking in the hills near Mt.Cook this weekend and we had a good time even though it isn't a good flowering year . There are postings in the travel section of the SRGC forum . We had keas for company and they are very cheeky parrots

Balclutha , New Zealand

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Jandals wrote:

The lads were out walking in the hills near Mt.Cook this weekend and we had a good time even though it isn't a good flowering year . There are postings in the travel section of the SRGC forum . We had keas for company and they are very cheeky parrots

To see some of the remarkable native New Zealand alpine flora, here's the link to the discussion on SRGC Forum:
http://www.srgc.org.uk/forum/index.php?topic=8116.0

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Steve Newall
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Title: Member
Joined: 2011-08-23

Thanks Mark . That was what I meant to say . Will post next trip on NARGS

Balclutha , New Zealand

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori wrote:

After a couple of -20 deg C nights, any lingering vestige of the summer is long past here.   (And so you don't have to ask, no, the following photo is not current, Trond.  :rolleyes:  :D)
 
Just a pleasant vista in Banff, featuring Pedicularis contorta:

Not current you say? I can't believe that! You are south of me and even in the mountains we still have no snow (except at the peaks). I am crossing the mountains tomorrow on my way to Oslo. However the weather forecast predicts a gale tomorrow and a foot of snow on sunday when I return. If you don't hear from me you know the reason ;D
BTW Pedicularis is one of my favorite genera!

Remember my holiday wish Jandals ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Kelaidis
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

There don't seem to be too many postings of late. I'm about to go to California for a few weeks, and probably won't be contributing much then, but since I have been sorting and labeling images from this past year, I thought a short retrospective (more like "images of the year") to give you all a glimpse of the terrific year we have had in the garden (as well as the mountains)...the mountain shots shall have to wait. So here goes a short revisit of my past year...

1) Corydalis malkensis dancing with Draba hispanica in the Rock Alpine Garden
2) Corydalis shanganii ssp. ainii (finally got it thanks to Odyssey Bulbs! Great operation that)
3) I believe this is C. s. ssp. shanganii: must more graceful than mine (growing at DBG)
4) Dactylorhiza majalis, loving my bog
5) I think I got this stunning erigeron as E. algidus: doesn't quite match the description. Whatever it is, it is the most beautiful of its genus and seemingly easy to grow.
6) Narcissus 'Sun Disk': one of the few hybrid dwarf daffodils that likes me
7) A trough full of fleabanes: Erigeron compositus 'Red Desert' (tiny white) and "Erigeron nanus" in purple. (Not sure of the latter's ID)
8) Penstemon fruticosus in my home garden

Enough for now!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Congratulations Panayoti, your post marks the 100th page in this "Image of the day" topic.  You show some fine plants here, more than making up for the irregularity of posted images of the day.  The topic "Image of the day" is the top viewed topic on NARGS Forum with 34729 views as of this date, I too check out this topic regularly with enthusiasm. Whatever your Erigeron "algidus" is, it's a wonderful plant.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Anonymous
Title: Guest

Panayoti,  Your photos are very nice.  I must admit some plant envy.  After seeing your photo of Dactylorhiza majalis I unsuccessfully searched online for a nursery that carries this plant.

I had purchased Penstemon fructicosa a number of years ago from a local nursery.  Unfortunately, I was not able to maintain it very long in the garden.  To successfully grow this species I would have to put it in a pot where I can move it to a cooler position in summer.

James

Kelaidis
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Thanks, James, for your kind comments....and Mark too! Didn't realize I was centernarian! Already.

The Dactylorhiza came from England: Several British nurseries used to sell them to us. Forgot the name (will let you know when I remember).

Penstemon fruticosus has many forms, and I have seen quite a few in eastern and midwestern rock gardens over the years: it is more of a mesic plant. I would plant it with saxifrages and dianthus...which I suspect you grow already well?

Thanks again! Hope you all had a great Thanksgiving...

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Those corydalis are truly awesome!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Stunning images PK!  BTW, do you mind if I repost them in the NARGS image galleries?

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

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