Image of the day - 2012

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Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Thanks Trond! Those are tremendous - I particularly like the children coming through the snow at the end of the first one. If I could set a camera up in our local woods and follow the anemones and bluebells flowering in spring that would be something else; those have given me more food for thought. Will see if I can discover more advice in English before I delve into Norwegian!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

These vidos are superb, Trond. The site must be very secure and preferably on one's own land - a camera wouldn't last twelve hours in the woods near us, let alone twelve months - and the individual images seem to be taken when the weather conditions are clement i.e. no 'active' precipitation.

An image from 2004 now - Globularias & Violas, Wengen.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Tim wrote:

Thanks Trond! Those are tremendous - I particularly like the children coming through the snow at the end of the first one. If I could set a camera up in our local woods and follow the anemones and bluebells flowering in spring that would be something else; those have given me more food for thought. Will see if I can discover more advice in English before I delve into Norwegian!

You are welcome! I would love to see your local bluebell wood through a year - or at least a spring ;)

Booker wrote:

These vidos are superb, Trond. The site must be very secure and preferably on one's own land - a camera wouldn't last twelve hours in the woods near us, let alone twelve months - and the individual images seem to be taken when the weather conditions are clement i.e. no 'active' precipitation.

An image from 2004 now - Globularias & Violas, Wengen.

Cliff, I think he places his camera on his balcony ;D

More nice summer reminder!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Beautiful, Cliff! 
I enjoyed the time lapse videos, Trond.  Sometimes, I think time really does flash by like that... or is it just me?  :)

A couple of mountain pix - Salix sp. in bloom and dramatic scenery:
 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I love when in nature plants intermingle; the view of the dwarf pink-flowered salix (any idea about what species it is?) and the leaves of Dryas mixed in, give inspiration to try emulating the combination in the garden.

As usual, the vastness of mountain scenes in your area leave me breathless, it would be superb to have such access to remarkable mountain terrain.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori wrote:

I enjoyed the time lapse videos, Trond.  Sometimes, I think time really does flash by like that... or is it just me?  :)

No, it is not just you, Lori :-\  The time is accelerating!

Nice scenery - hope I sometime get the time to view it in person!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Tim wrote:

Crocus are such ephemeral but beautiful plants and I am still surprised to see them in the autumn despite having grown this one, C. speciosus, for many years. These are growing in a bed strongly devoted to bulbs and because it changes so much during the year I have started taking daily pictures with the idea of putting them together as a video. Does anyone have any experience of doing something similar? I think this will probably be a strong learning experience.

I know there is some sort of software on my computer for making short animated gifs from  series of photos, but I have not used it personally.. if you do find something that works, let us know- I regularly take photos on daily drives and around home from the same spots (though maybe not exact enough?) through the year - and years! would be interesting to put them together somehow..
Lori- I was wondering if the fall blooming Crocus would flower earlier here to avoid early winter, but based on your comments, I guess not...lol.. This has been a long/early bit of winter- interesting to know what will happen in weeks to come.. We are also still waiting for that long delayed warm up.. wondering how much of the snow will melt- in spite of some warm forecasts, snow will be slow to go in shady places...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

McDonough wrote:

...the view of the dwarf pink-flowered salix (any idea about what species it is?)...

Mark, I'm pretty hopeless with willow IDs but I've been put onto the names of a couple of willow experts recently!  I will send some of my better photos off to see if it's possible to ID them.
I'm still hopeful that if a few can be positively ID'd, then I can read the key in relation to those species and then be able to understand the differentiations better.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Cohan - we have something similar on our computer for putting pictures together in a video. My wife has tried it with the first batch of photos I have taken. But even with a tripod permanently positioned I can't leave the camera in situ and the smallest difference in the image each time shows up. I hope we can get round this by adjusting the images individually so they line up correctly? I am already learning!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Peden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-04

McDonough wrote:

I've grown many forms of C. punctata, which took me a decade to eradicate (mostly), but I fear I have lost the battle with C. "takesimana"; the only way to deal with it invading my lawn and garden and surrounding woods, will be to move to a new location.

Interesting that a genus producing some of the most obstinately demure little plants is also capable of producing these "superplants". We have C. rapunculoides (?) here for decades, if not centuries, but I haven't yet seen the little beauty you describe. Probably best left that way! C. rapunculoides came to my garden on some daylily roots more than a dozen years ago and I have kept it in check -until, perhaps now. it does not prefer acid sand but since I have been modifying areas of the garden (and the garden has gotten bigger LOL!) I fear it is getting loose! I still think that someday I will just be able to go in and redo the entire area where it is beginning to spread and, in so doing, remove it. Errr... Is this folly?

Michael Peden
Lake Champlain Valley, zone 4b
Four and a half months frost free
Snow cover not guaranteed

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