Image of the day - 2012

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Booker
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Joined: 2010-01-30

Tiny gentian in a hollow in a limestone boulder, Dolomites.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Howey
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-05-17

Todd:  I, too, have a Campanula makaschavilii? flowering out of season.  At least it looks like that is what it is.  Cliff, like the way you have whited out the corners of your flower photos - makes the flowers look even more precious.  Fran

Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Frances, nice to have such a pretty wand of campanula bloom so late in the season. Not familiar with the name Campanula makaschvilii, I looked it up; listed as a species from the Caucasus in Graham Nicholls "Dwarf Campanulas" book, stating "it resembles a smaller less hairy C. alliariifolia", and The Plant List considers it a synonym of C. alliariifolia.  Here are a few links to photos of C. alliariifolia.

http://www.robsplants.com/plants/CampaAllia
http://jardinsmichelcorbeil.com/images/camp.%20alliar.jpg
http://luirig.altervista.org/cpm/albums/bot-units04/campanula-alliariifo...

My guess is your plant is actually Campanula punctata, particularly the form going around as C. takesimana, considered a synonym of C. punctata by both Graham Nicholls and The Plant List.  I've grown many forms of C. punctata, which took me a decade to eradicate (mostly), but I fear I have lost the battle with C. "takesimana"; the only way to deal with it invading my lawn and garden and surrounding woods, will be to move to a new location.  It is most floriferous, with voluminous showers of big white pink-tinged bells, a beautiful plant but an aggressive invader all the same.  I consider this the most invasive plant I have ever witnessed in my near half century gardening in New England.  The slightest piece of the stringy white roots and runners left behind when digging out the plant, gleefully sprout many new plants. The dust like seed wind-disperse far and wide, germinating most anywhere too. So watch your plant very carefully for signs of spreading, you might want to take drastic action.

Campanula "takesimana" seeded into a lawn area, then spread into an are under a large Katsura tree.  I've not been able to eradicate it once it gets into the lawn, it has been impossible to remove when entwined through the tough surface roots of the Katsura tree.

Campanula "takesimana" will show some variation in color (white through pinkish and lavender shades), degree of color spotting, flower shape and degree of petal tip flaring. Beautiful in flower, but I shudder when I see the wands of bloom, and all the seed and runners it'll be making.

Campanula punctata alba, that sowed itself in front of the stone wall that fronts my property and the street.  There are numerous color deep forms of punctata, all are beautiful, all are to be avoided.  Even when grown in pots, the roots will come out of the drainage holes and invade any nearly soil medium.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I too do grow Campanula takesimana (I believe it was from Thompson & Morgan seed with that name). However, it is not as aggressive here. I have other Campanulas which is much worse!

Still summer in your World, Cliff?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Especially choice view/location of the Gentiana, Cliff!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Howey
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-05-17

Mark - Ahhh..  Anyway, I have not collected seeds for the seedexes and my single plant is quite a distance from the lawn - however, I'll keep my eye on it.  As you say, it is probably Campanula punctata.  Fran

Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Crocus are such ephemeral but beautiful plants and I am still surprised to see them in the autumn despite having grown this one, C. speciosus, for many years. These are growing in a bed strongly devoted to bulbs and because it changes so much during the year I have started taking daily pictures with the idea of putting them together as a video. Does anyone have any experience of doing something similar? I think this will probably be a strong learning experience.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Very nice, Tim! 
Reminds me of my pitifully small number of Crocus speciosus which have been snow-covered for the past couple of weeks.  It's supposed to melt off this weekend (though the timing for this return to more normal temperatures keeps getting pushed further and further out!) and I'll have to see if they've shown themselves yet.  It won't be much of a display even so.  ;D

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Quote : Cliff, like the way you have whited out the corners of your flower photos - makes the flowers look even more precious.  Fran

Thanks Fran ... it works with some images but, unfortunately, ruins others. LOL.

Thanks Trond and Cohan for your very kind comments.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Tim wrote:

Crocus are such ephemeral but beautiful plants and I am still surprised to see them in the autumn despite having grown this one, C. speciosus, for many years. These are growing in a bed strongly devoted to bulbs and because it changes so much during the year I have started taking daily pictures with the idea of putting them together as a video. Does anyone have any experience of doing something similar? I think this will probably be a strong learning experience.

I can't advice you, Tim, but here are two similar videos (maybe I have shown one before) but not as nice as your bed will be!

And here is the receipt how to do it (in Norwegian)!

http://nrkbeta.no/2010/01/05/hele-2009-paa-120-sekunder/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fOF42_OcZ3Q&hd=1

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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