Image of the day - 2012

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Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Sorry being so slow to get back to you regarding the dwarf form of Maianthemum stellatum in newfoundland.  It rarely get taller than 15 cm.  We have the normal form as well which for us might reach 60 cm.  Trond, our dwarf form typically grows among Empetrum nigrum and always within sight of the sea.

Rick, thats some display of flax!

Well, we have been inundated with three consecutive snow storms.  Over 100 cm with winds in excess of 80km/h.  Hard to believe I had open lawn a week ago.  Guess no early spring for me!  I think we have the only snow in all of North America.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Yikes, you sure get the snowfalls out there, Todd!

We are back into a warm spell, with the snow disappearing fast.
Thinking of spring to come, here's a shot of Penstemon nitidus with other spring/early summer flowers in the front yard:

                 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Todd wrote:

Well, we have been inundated with three consecutive snow storms.  Over 100 cm with winds in excess of 80km/h.  Hard to believe I had open lawn a week ago.  Guess no early spring for me!  I think we have the only snow in all of North America.

We heard the East was getting hammered! We have not had significant new snow in some time, but there is still plenty on the ground- piles a couple feet deep where its shovelled around our parking/house etc... lots of bare spots under trees, but open areas mostly still under several inches to a foot... all my plantings are still covered, though some rock garden bits will be showing soon +6 today, -5C monday, then just below or just above most of the week-- still warm for Jan!- but snow will only be melting in sunny places..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Todd wrote:

Sorry being so slow to get back to you regarding the dwarf form of Maianthemum stellatum in newfoundland.  It rarely get taller than 15 cm.  We have the normal form as well which for us might reach 60 cm.  Trond, our dwarf form typically grows among Empetrum nigrum and always within sight of the sea.

Rick, thats some display of flax!

Well, we have been inundated with three consecutive snow storms.  Over 100 cm with winds in excess of 80km/h.  Hard to believe I had open lawn a week ago.  Guess no early spring for me!  I think we have the only snow in all of North America.

Thanks, Todd. The dwarf form should fit perfect into the landscape here ;)

Although we have had strong wind and snow it is not more than 10-15cm but piling up some places. With rain tomorrow I do wonder how I'll get to work!

Lori, you're making me dream sweet dreams with your picture!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

More sweet dreams of spring...
Asperula boissieri:

           

It's been a very satisfying grower, with bloom starting in the first year from seed, and flowering lushly over a very long period in its second year (when this picture was taken).  I started the seeds at room temperature, then, with no germination after about 2 weeks, moved them to the cold room, where germination commenced after another 12 days.  (From that, I'm not sure if chilling is required or not, or if it would have germinated in warm conditions with time.)  The seeds were collected by Mojmir Pavelka from rocky limestone slopes at 2200m elevation in the Killini Mts., Greece.  As one might expect from its appearance, it's evergreen.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Great little plant, and looking right at home in your tufa!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

It's magic how the plants seem at home in tufa!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Wish I had access to tufa...I have never managed to keep Asperula alive, but I might have a chance if I tried it in tufa.

Here is a natural crevice garden...Argentina anserina growing in a limestone crack in northern Newfoundland.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Looks good, Todd! I've been trying to figure out whether there are any other (ex) potentillas that can be confused with this species? I've seen it in towns/cities occasionally, and near shores in seemingly dry (growing flat) or not (taller) locations-- Flora of Alberta lists it as being native and having a habitat of lakeshores etc.. is this all the same plant or is there another stoloniferous Potentilla? Is it always native in North America, or in urban situations would be an introduced form?  I'll dig for pics...

Okay, found some, first three are in an empty lot in the town of Sylvan Lake, Alberta; as the name suggests, this is a lakeshore town, though this site is not near the shore, still on flats that might have been shore long ago..

   

Second set is at the shore of Gull Lake, Alberta.. some low plants, and some in a moist grass area that are taller..

   

   

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Argentina anserina is the former Potentilla anserina and is common across the prairies... as a kid, I remember seeing it mainly on the edges of mud puddles along the sidewalks!  I've always thought of it as being somewhat invasive but I've never grown it so I don't know how well founded that assumption is.  I've found it sort of amusing that Fraser's Thimble Farms has sold it for many years now (surprising to me but why not, I suppose - though until seeing Todd's photo, I hadn't thought of it as being all that ornamental) and secondly, that they refer to it as hardy down to zone 6.   :rolleyes: ;D ;D  (It would be nice if the natural range of plants would be considered when zone ratings are published!) 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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