Image of the day - 2012

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cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Nice place, Trond! More varied than the field I showed, which |I am quite sure is a cultivated one-- many fields here are sown in grasses and/or legumes for hay and grazing for some years, then they will be plowed and put to a grain/seed crop such as barley, oats or canola (rape)- not as much wheat in my immediate area... and then repeat, etc..
So in this kind of filed, there are not a lot of wildflowers as they don't have time to establish before its plowed again- the Campanula will have come in from the roadside ditch, and may be only in a strip along the edge that does not get plowed! Other places we have pastures for grazing that are just cleared of trees, but not plowed, and they can have more diversity..

Rick-- great blue! I suppose someone in Alberta must be growing flax for seed, but I have never seen a field...

Mark, I always forget about flax- there are a few spots I've seen Linum growing wild (down south and in the montane zone; also pale blues) but have not been there at the right for seeds, or didn't look for them.. need to correct that, I'd like to have some seeding around, they probably wouldn't have as easy a time of it here as in your climate, but I could keep them in semi/wild places so they have lots of competition...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

cohan wrote:

Nice place, Trond! More varied than the field I showed, which |I am quite sure is a cultivated one-- many fields here are sown in grasses and/or legumes for hay and grazing for some years, then they will be plowed and put to a grain/seed crop such as barley, oats or canola (rape)- not as much wheat in my immediate area... and then repeat, etc..
So in this kind of filed, there are not a lot of wildflowers as they don't have time to establish before its plowed again- the Campanula will have come in from the roadside ditch, and may be only in a strip along the edge that does not get plowed! Other places we have pastures for grazing that are just cleared of trees, but not plowed, and they can have more diversity..

"My" meadow is kind of cultivated as a small herd of calves do graze here every summer. Woody species spreading into the meadow are also removed on a regular basis. The soil is mostly fine quartz sand.

I've seen small patches of flax here in some gardens but not meadows! Although flax (Linum usatissimum)  has been grown here since the bronze age it is not found wild and not grown commercially since 19th century (American cotton replaced it ;) ). Another plant grown for its fibers is nettle (netle or nesle in Norw), a very important fiber plant as the word net (nett in Norw.) and "å netle" (= to sew) show. The latter plant is found wild ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Every now and again farmers here grow flax in place of rape - it is far more beautiful to see a field of blue! The field below our garden was planted this way one year and after harvesting the remaining stems were brought together in heaps and burnt. It seemed as though the whole field was on fire! (and my wife thought I had blown up the shed at the bottom of the garden!)... I wish some other linums would grow as well; L. narbonnense has always been a favourite of mine but seems to set very little seed and is very difficult to root cuttings from. Very beautiful silver-blue flowers though.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Hoy wrote:

cohan wrote:

Nice place, Trond! More varied than the field I showed, which |I am quite sure is a cultivated one-- many fields here are sown in grasses and/or legumes for hay and grazing for some years, then they will be plowed and put to a grain/seed crop such as barley, oats or canola (rape)- not as much wheat in my immediate area... and then repeat, etc..
So in this kind of filed, there are not a lot of wildflowers as they don't have time to establish before its plowed again- the Campanula will have come in from the roadside ditch, and may be only in a strip along the edge that does not get plowed! Other places we have pastures for grazing that are just cleared of trees, but not plowed, and they can have more diversity..

"My" meadow is kind of cultivated as a small herd of calves do graze here every summer. Woody species spreading into the meadow are also removed on a regular basis. The soil is mostly fine quartz sand.

I've seen small patches of flax here in some gardens but not meadows! Although flax (Linum usatissimum)  has been grown here since the bronze age it is not found wild and not grown commercially since 19th century (American cotton replaced it ;) ). Another plant grown for its fibers is nettle (netle or nesle in Norw), a very important fiber plant as the word net (nett in Norw.) and "å netle" (= to sew) show. The latter plant is found wild ;)

I know nettles are supposed to be very nutritious, but I didn't know they were used for fibre! Something to look into...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

cohan wrote:

I know nettles are supposed to be very nutritious, but I didn't know they were used for fibre! Something to look into...

As you supposedly read Norwegian after all my lessons you can try this site: http://home.online.no/~lenbakke/body.htm

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Trond, you seriously overestimate me....lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

cohan wrote:

Trond, you seriously overestimate me....lol

Don't you have google?  ;D

This one has to be admired from below - Codonopsis clematidea!

   

The access is easier here - Rosa roxburghii

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Hoy wrote:

cohan wrote:

Trond, you seriously overestimate me....lol

Don't you have google?  ;D

I use google translate on occasion- it has some limited value for short, straightforward texts- a short list of facts etc, but overall, I find it more likely to produce something more like abstract poetry than any useful information, so usually I don't bother, unless I really can't find the information in a language I can make some sense of myself..lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Regarding the computer translations, sometimes it helps to know a bit about the grammar, etc. of the second language to make good sense of the results.

I am very envious of anyone who speaks multiple languages. 

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

I was posting some images of what I decided is probably Gentiana affinis the other day, in my Alberta Wanderings thread; I found some more images of them, later in the season.. more pics here, showing some of the variation in leaf form, and fall colours, ranging from in bloom to nearly, but not quite, ripe seed:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=591.msg14622#msg14622

   

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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