Hardy Succulents - Aizoaceae

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Although the winters here perhaps are milder than yours, you have more sun and warmer summers and more sun in the fall. I think the plants need sun to harden off in the fall.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Kelaidis wrote:

The second is 'Tiffendell' collected by my colleague Dan Johnson, who has a sharp eye. It gets enormous here (over a yard across) and likewise never has cold damage.

Love to have this one but I can not seem to find a commercial source. It looks like a real show stopper! Maybe in a year or two it will be making the rounds at the nurseries.

PK  have you ever compiled a list of the hardy Aizoaceae you grow in your garden? I for one would be very interested!

Aloinopsis spathulata is a little gem I have had moderate luck with. It will do great for two of three years until I hit a snowy winter with a lot of freeze thaw cycles then it rots off. I keep trying it in increasingly, sharply drained substraits in the hope of hitting the perfect combination.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Weiser wrote:

Aloinopsis spathulata is a little gem I have had moderate luck with. It will do great for two of three years until I hit a snowy winter with a lot of freeze thaw cycles then it rots off. I keep trying it in increasingly, sharply drained substraits in the hope of hitting the perfect combination.

John, that's a beauty.  The flowers of this genus seem distinct in the way thy form a low central cone.  Seeing this one had me googling and losing a couple hours of viewing more succulent eye-candy, my goodness there are some awesome dwarf succulents.  I'm not sure how many Aloinopsis are hardy ones, but there seem to be a good number of species and cultivars.  Here's some links that caught my attention:

The Tucson-Gardener.com has lots of nice galleries, with an emphasis on more tender cacti and succulent species.
Flower gallery:
http://www.tucson-gardener.com/graphics/Galleries/Flowers/Flowers.html
Spination Gallery
http://tucson-gardener.com/graphics/Galleries/Photo%20Galleries.html
Collection:
http://www.tucson-gardener.com/Collection.html

Some Aloinopsis and Aloinanthus
========================
Aloinopsis Karoo Red Mix hybrid
http://blog.highcountrygardens.com/wp-content/uploads/Aloinopsis-Karoo-R...

Lots of good stuff at Sunscapes:
http://www.sunscapes.net/Pages/Catalog.htm

Two Aloinopsis at Sunscapes, A. spathulata, and check out the hybrid one named 'Thai Dyed':
http://www.sunscapes.net/Pages/Catalog.htm
http://www.sunscapes.net/images/A.%20spathulata%2032%25%203.0.JPG
http://www.sunscapes.net/images/Titanopsis%20x%20%27Thai%20Dyed%27%2032%...

And then check out the Aloinanthus (hybrids between Aloinopsis and Nanathus; superb!)
These are listed as "not reliably hardy here in zone 5 but will survive some winters in warm microclimates"
A. x ’High Noon’
http://www.sunscapes.net/images/Aloinopsis%20X-1%20%27High%20Noon%27%20%...

A. x 'Morning Sky'
http://www.sunscapes.net/images/Aloinopsis%20x%20%27Morning%20Sky%27%203...

A. x 'Last Light'
http://www.sunscapes.net/images/Aloinopsis%20x%20%27Last%20Light%27%203....

A. x 'Opera Mauve'
http://www.sunscapes.net/images/Aloinopsis%20x%20%27Opera%20Mauve%27.JPG

A. x 'Sunscapes Pink'
http://www.sunscapes.net/images/Aloinopsis%20x%20%27Sunscapes%20Pink%27%...

A. x 'Yellow Eye'
http://www.sunscapes.net/images/Aloinopsis%20x%20%20%27Yellow%20Eye%27%2...

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

A very attractive plant!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Thought I'd revive this topic with a few pictures of another hardy Aizoaceae.

These shots are of Chasmatope musculinum. I have had this plant for five years and it has proven to be hardy for me. It is a woody slow creeper and cuttings are easy as it likes to root as it expands in size. As you can see it blooms in early spring usually starting from mid May - late May for me. 

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Just catching up with this, and upon reawakening the topic, John somehow I missed commenting on your photos of Chasmatope musculinum.  I love learning about all of these hardy succulents, inspired by each new species and cultivar I learn about.  This one sure is unique, reminiscent of a dandelion genetically slammed together with a succulent, a very cool plant!

After being under 5-6 feet of snow, the troughs on the sunny south side of a garden shed next to my driveway, sufficiently warm and sunny in this microclimate to melt away the snow, suddenly the troughs are exposed and visible again.  Actually, this is the time to worry, because it is usually the wild swings in temperature and moisture in spring that does the most damage. 

In the photo you can see a couple Delosperma plants, the one on the lower is the new species with orange-hot-pink-red flowers;
see: http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=468.msg5118#msg5118    Panayoti...it's looking fine, firm and very much alive.  Behind it is a smaller brownish-leaf plant of 'White Nugget'.  On the left is the winter red-purple leaf color on Penstemon procerus var. formosus, and a microphlox cultivar behind it.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Mark
Good to see your garden emerging.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Weiser wrote:

Thought I'd revive this topic with a few pictures of another hardy Aizoaceae.

These shots are of Chasmatope musculinum. I have had this plant for five years and it has proven to be hardy for me. It is a woody slow creeper and cuttings are easy as it likes to root as it expands in size. As you can see it blooms in early spring usually starting from mid May - late May for me.  

What's hardy for you isn't for me, I'll bet! Although it is less cold here than many other places it is too wet and too little Sunshine!
But I will try more Aizoaceae to if I can find any hardy enough!

McDonough wrote:

Just catching up with this, and upon reawakening the topic, John somehow I missed commenting on your photos of Chasmatope musculinum.  I love learning about all of these hardy succulents, inspired by each new species and cultivar I learn about.  This one sure is unique, reminiscent of a dandelion genetically slammed together with a succulent, a very cool plant!

After being under 5-6 feet of snow, the troughs on the sunny south side of a garden shed next to my driveway, sufficiently warm and sunny in this microclimate to melt away the snow, suddenly the troughs are exposed and visible again.  Actually, this is the time to worry, because it is usually the wild swings in temperature and moisture in spring that does the most damage.  

Although you had and still have more snow than I you are catching up Mark! That's the advantage of living far south ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

Although you had and still have more snow than I you are catching up Mark! That's the advantage of living far south ;)

Haha, "living far south" ;D
We had a brief break from frigid temperatures, but its back to being frigid again with snow predicted tonight.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

:o You are still a southerner to me!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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