Hardy Succulents - Aizoaceae

98 posts / 0 new
Last post
RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

McDonough wrote:

Rick, do you bring all these plants to plant sales, you are a propagation-meister!  

Regarding my addiction to propagation, our Minnesota Chapter NARGS plant sale and I have a symbiotic relationship.  I am the biggest single donor, and our Chapter has incorporated as a non-profit organization according to state and federal guidelines.  My donations are a significant tax break for me.  Besides, I'd hate to see the extras just get thrown away.

Re: Delosperma bosserianum in particular: the seed was six years old, and they were so tiny that I wondered about their viability.  Hence, so many seedlings in that one pot.  I must have thrown away half of them as it was...

I haven't sold any of them, as I am not done testing and futsing with them. I am hoping to be able to raise them out of the soil as is done with many other caudiciforms, to expose the caudex.   Anyway, for the last few years I have instigated a "no houseplants" rule for our sales.  They never sell, donors bring the ugliest specimens (in general), and I am left with have to dispose of them at the end of the sale.

(edited for correct bosserianum spelling)

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I just searched for that Delosperma on IPNI (http://www.ipni.org/) searching on Delosperma b* and I see a spelling difference.  That might affect any google searches on the name.  IPNI is one of my favorite bookmarks :D
Delosperma bosserianum Marais.

We just tried posting at nearly the same time!  So, Delosperma maintain seed viability for a long time, good to know.  With all of our pouring rain after a week of deep freeze, today I did check into the Delospermas in my beds and troughs, and they all look fine and the foliage is turgid... of course it is only December.

Keep "futsing" with your plants and report the results here, I think everyone likes those sorts of experiments and documentation!  I often consider my garden a "science lab" (perhaps an excuse to cover for the fact it is not the most beautiful nor developed garden around), but I do see it that way, and it suits me just fine.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

VBouffard
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-05-03

Hi Mark - going back to your original post - this is probably useless information, but your plant looks exactly like my seedlings of Faucaria tigrina looked.  Now that they're bigger, the leaves are longer and the plants look less chunky.  So I would say you don't have this faucaria, but maybe it's something close.  I'm not familiar with the faucaria the other poster mentioned.

all the best,
Vivien Bouffard

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hi Vivien,

Welcome to the NARGS Forum!
  Where abouts are you gardening, are any of these hardy succulents hardy for you?  I've not heard of Faucaria tigrina, but I'll look it up; the species name intrigues me because the common name on my plant is "tiger jaws", and "tigrinum" means tiger-like (usually in reference to spotting).

Who knows what my plant really is, a Faucaria or a Stomatium, these little succulent plants are all very new to me, but what I'm seeing from photos posted by others with more experience than myself, I like what I see! :D  If the plant survives the winter and flowers in 2011, then I'll have a better set of details with which to find an identity of this chubby little succulent.  If my plant looks anything as pretty as John Weiser's Stomatium mustillnum, I would be more than happy.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Follow-up: I have googled Faucaria tigrina, and I agree that is not a match for my plant, the teeth on that species are much too pronounced to be a match.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Vivian
Welcome to the forum it was good to hear from you. I would love to hear about any other aizoaceae you grow and any cultural information you have on them.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Mark, an interestining conundrum regarding the epithet bosserianum:  more than one site claim their information source as the IPNI, yet list it as bosseranum -without the "i" !!!

I think you're right though, D. bosserianum must be correct.  If anyone has access to The Kew Bulletin. 33(3): 521 (1979), we would know for sure as that is the first publishing, I assume.  I changed my previous posts to reflect the correct spelling.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

VBouffard
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-05-03

I don't have too much experience with these plants.  I just like growing various things from seed so I can see what they do right from the beginning.  It's really fun to see how plants like faucaria, aloe, and agave develop.  The seed for the Faucaria came from JL Hudson; I shouldn't think they would be anywhere near hardy here in Norwood, MA.  I haven't ordered from Silverhill, but one of these days will place an order with Mesa Garden in NM.  My friend Art Scarpa, who founded the Cacti & Succulent Society in MA, tells me that Silverhill gets a lot of their seed from Mesa!  Their prices are low, their listings extensive, and no phytosanitary stuff to pay for!

All I have in the way of delosperma is the most ordinary stuff, which winters over pretty well, but is a bit shy in the blooming department.  Probably wants more sun, which is in short supply at my house.

Vivien

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Vivien, I used to live in the same town as you, near the Walpole line, but now located northwest of Boston near the New Hampshire line.  If any of the Delosperma that I received this year make it through winter, I'll certainly post here.  And on another encouraging note, this spring and summer I found that a local nursery in Groton, one that is supplied by wholesaler Sunny Border with perennials and rock garden type plants, had a surprisingly good offering of Delosperma and other "hardy succulents". So maybe these plants are becoming increasingly available and can be tried out to see how they manage our New England winters (and early spring).

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Great to see all those delos in your garden Mark!

I have Ebracteola wilmaniae opening its flowers on warmish days.

I am attaching two pix of the two best pink flowered delos (in my opinion), both of which are very tough. The first is Delo. 'Lesotho Pink' introduced by David Salman, I believe from seed he got from Silverhill. It has gorgeous winter foliage color (a deep purple) and has never shown signs of cold damage here.

The second is 'Tiffendell' collected by my colleage Dan Johnson, who has a sharp eye. It gets enormous here (over a yard across) and likewise never has cold damage.

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Pages

Log in or register to post comments