Hardy Succulents - Aizoaceae

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

A person from the Czech Republic emailed me with a link to their web site with Delosperma photos.  The site is in Czeck language, but you can use the 2nd link down on the left to find Delosperma.  Or, view the site using Google Translate.
http://delosperma.webnode.cz/delospermy/

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Mark
I enjoyed looking at your link.

Have you seen Martin Tversted's photo sight?
http://public.fotki.com/Northern-Nursery/

Thought I'd post a few shots of Stomatium mustillnum. This is a night bloomer and very hardy for me.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Weiser wrote:

Mark
I enjoyed looking at your link.

Have you seen Martin Tversted's photo sight?
http://public.fotki.com/Northern-Nursery/

Thought I'd post a few shots of Stomatium mustillnum. This is a night bloomer and very hardy for me.

Thanks John.  Good link.  The Stomatium mustillnum looks awesome; I hope that my Stomatium proves equally hardy.  We're getting pretty cold here; 10 F this morning, and a high of 22 F, and no snow so far.  My Stomatium looks fine, but typically it is our late winter/early spring weather that kills plants, with alternating freezing/thawing and excessive winter/spring rains that do plants in. Stomatium in bloom has a most distinctive look over Delosperma.  I foresee another excessive-compulsive interest coming on ;D

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Oh my, I've been growing a Delosperma sp. that is the source of a mind altering drug (and I don't think it's a good kind)!  I received seed from someone because a caudiciform delosperma intrigued me.  It's ridiculously easy to grow, but the flowers are worth nothing.  It blooms all summer, and I had been checking off and on, looking for a flower that might make a good photo, and never came across one. (!)

Ridiculously easy to germinate, too.  Even the seed pod is more interesting than the flower, and that's not saying much.  (in a 2.25 inch spuare pot)

Delosperma bosserianum

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

The baby seedlings are so cute, more than I can say for the flowers ;)  Is this one hardy, or can I assume it is more of a houseplant sort of thing, like many caudiciforms are.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Yes, Delosperma bosserianum is a houseplant that summers outside for me.  I kinda tested its frost hardiness and these were the results:

1. Plants were expose one night to 23F(row 1), 32F(row 2) and never exposed to freezing(row 3).  Pic taken five days after.
2. About four weeks after exposure, and growing inside the house.  The middle three rows are all the "32F" exposed plants.

As you might expect, plants that were nipped by the frost, grew back more bushy.  They didn't seem to skip a beat from the cold temps, and in fact rebounded very quickly.

(edited for correct bosserianum spelling)

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

RickR wrote:

Oh my, I've been growing a Delosperma sp. that is the source of a mind altering drug (and I don't think it's a good kind)!  

There are quite a few psychotropic plants that we grow and don't know about. I can point to four off the top of my head that grow in my garden. 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_psychedelic_plants
What bugs me is how the internet search engines first direct you to sights that promote their use. Especially when you do a general search for a Genus of plants. The prime example is to use the word "Salvia" when searching. I find it very frustrating!

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Weiser wrote:

RickR wrote:

Oh my, I've been growing a Delosperma sp. that is the source of a mind altering drug (and I don't think it's a good kind)! 

There are quite a few psychotropic plants that we grow and don't know about. I can point to four off the top of my head that grow in my garden. 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_psychedelic_plants
What bugs me is how the internet search engines first direct you to sights that promote their use. Especially when you do a general search for a Genus of plants. The prime example is to use the word "Salvia" when searching. I find it very frustrating!

Fascinating link!  I knew of a few plants in this category but had no idea about such a wide range of plants (I think I'll bookmark this one :P). Funny what you say about searching Salvia, in a similar situation during my obsessive Epimedium research, was trying to find information in E. sagittatum and related species (for strictly botanical/taxonomic purposes), and one gets a million hits about the aphrodisiac usage of E. sagittatum, almost to the exclusion of finding anything else about the plant.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Yes, Delosperma bosseranum is a houseplant that summers outside for me.  I kinda tested its frost hardiness and these were the results:

1. Plants were expose one night to 23F(row 1), 32F(row 2) and never exposed to freezing(row 3).  Pic taken five days after.
2. About four weeks after exposure, and growing inside the house.  The middle three rows are all the "32F" exposed plants.

As you might expect, plants that were nipped by the frost, grew back more bushy.  They didn't seem to skip a beat from the cold temps, and in fact rebounded very quickly.

Rick, do you bring all these plants to plant sales, you are a propagation-meister!  Interesting experiment.  I have an idea about how those plants might do if left for several weeks of freezing temps ;)  I've been purposely not looking at my Delosperma plantings, we had 4 days with night temps down to as low as 10 F and daytime temps only reaching low or mid 20s, but it was dry and sunny; freezing rain this morning, and the week projected to be a snowy/icy/rainy mix... seems winter finally arrived in New England.  I did clean off all the fallen leaves on these little succulents, fearing that heavy soggy leaves would be a threat to them.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Weiser wrote:

There are quite a few psychotropic plants that we grow and don't know about. I can point to four off the top of my head that grow in my garden.  
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_psychedelic_plants
What bugs me is how the internet search engines first direct you to sights that promote their use. Especially when you do a general search for a Genus of plants. The prime example is to use the word "Salvia" when searching. I find it very frustrating!

Of course, that is how I found out about D. bosserianum: I stumble upon it googling.  At the time, I did see that others of the genus also contained psychedelics .  It's interesting that the wiki page does not list bosserianum.  Maybe because there is no real scientific backing (?)

(edited for correct bosserianum spelling)

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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