Garden Visits - what inspires you!

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Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

What a fantastic garden Lori! Alan Furness's garden in Northumberland is the only one I know where the plants look so natural, and unfortunately I only have slides. Not so many people in the UK devote themselves so much to growing alpines in the garden in this way, but I think a few more might do after seeing those photos. The eriogonum is delicious!!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Sellars
Sellars's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-29

It's true that there are very few gardens focused on growing alpines in a natural environment.  These are fabulous photos Lori and the garden is a real inspiration.  Stephanie Ferguson gave a talk on developing her garden at the WWSW on Vancouver Island last February and it was an outstanding presentation.  I particularly like your photo of Douglasia nivalis. It looks just like plants I have seen in the Wenatchee Mountains.

David Sellars
From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada

Feature your favourite hikes at:
www.mountainflora.ca
MountainFlora videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/MountainFlora

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Lori,
I am enjoying these magnificent cameos immensely from the comfort of our chalet room high above the Campolongo Pass here in the majestic Dolomites. An enormous electric storm is passing through the mountains and life giving rain is filling the streams and gullys.
We have spent the day walking across screes and boulder fields where alpine plants survive and thrive in much the same way that they do in this inspirational garden that you so kindly illustrate.  Many thanks to you and the heartiest of congratulations to Stephanie on her marvelous creation.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

deesen
deesen's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Oh my! What a cracking garden. If only I had the skill; the rocks; the artistic ability; the plants; oh!, and the time. Thanks for posting Lori.

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Lori wrote:

Among the many cacti, South American Maihuenia spp.:

This is the first I have heard of Maihuenia surviving in Alberta--interesting! Though Calgary is still quite a different climate than here.. Maihuenia poeppiggii actually are not supposed to need dry winters as many cacti do, but we are still that bit colder than you, especially in the city...

Do you have any idea how many years she has been growing this and the Echinocereus? For some in that genus, its not the winter lows that I worry about, as much as lack of summer heat.. I guess she has created a hot micro climate for these? I plan a 'hot' bed for some of those...

Rick-- M poeppiggi needs winter (outdoors or at least a few months) stratification, unlike most cacti, even most cold hardy spp; alternative treatments include GA3, high heat and pricking seed coat, etc.. similar applies to Pediocactus and Sclero

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Lucky you, Cliff.  There's nothing better than a really good thunderstorm in the mountains.  We only had a little one while we were there - some thunder and lightning but nothing really sensational.  Happy plant hunting!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Anne and Cliff, I think there's a big difference in how "enjoyable" alpine lightning and thunderstorms can be depending on whether one is safely ensconced in a cushy chalet or the alternative!!  ;D ;D

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Agreed, Lori, but the chalet doesn't have to be cushy, just safely enclosed.  One year there was a really strong thunderstorm in Corvara and the hotel temporarily lost electricity, as did the rest of the village.  It just made the lightning that more dramatic.  We spent a lot of time in Colorado dodging thunderstorms and I recall starting early in the morning so that we could be below treeline by 3p.m. or so.  The storms seemed to occur quite regularly about the same time in the afternoon.  The worst was looking up to the ridge and seeing nothing but blue sky half an hour later!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Actually what I meant was that the presence of a chalet was cushy...    ;)  :)  :D

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

AmyO
AmyO's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-06

It's so nice to see some of the plants in this fantastic garden after reading about its construction in the latest NARGS journal. I can't wait for the next installation on the Ferguson's adventure in alpine garden building!

Amy Olmsted
Hubbardton, VT, Zone 4

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