Garden Visits - what inspires you!

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Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Skulski wrote:

Yes, we have been having rather cold weather!  Supposedly, it should get above zero by Thursday... we'll see.
http://www.nucleus.com/~silverview/weather/trends.htm

This is not an inspiring picture, but it is our backyard in the twilight at ~3:40 pm yesterday....

Actually, Lori, I find this a very inspiring photo.  I wish my garden looked like this all winter long.  So much damage is done by the combination of winter winds, sun, and no snow cover -  not to mention last winter's unexpected thaws with rain.  Yuk!!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Anne, the last two winters have been unusually snowy, but we don't normally have lasting snow cover.  Who knows what this year will bring?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

I found this very inspiring thread on searching for somewhere to post a few pictures of friends gardens in Kent. We have quite wide ranging interests in our group, with one member (Mike Darvill) growing very few alpines but very many trees and shrubs! However, as someone who likes these too here are a few examples:

Pterostyrax hispida - very lovely in flower despite the wind having blown half of the flowers off the plant!
Rhododendron cinnabarinum - the flowers are over but what foliage! This plant was a gift from the very fine plantsman, Tom Wood, who ran Oakover Nursery in Kent and for a long time was the Secretary of the International Plant Propagator's Society. Mike and Tom both have a passion for woody plants, and notably Magnolias!
Cornus kousa 'Satomi' - A small plant but showing promise with its pink bracts.
Impatiens omeiana - A surprising plant that looks nowhere near hardy but here running around happily underground and with great foliage (Mike's garden is high up on the North Downs and was nowhere near as cold as ours this winter - but he does get very strong winds!).

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Some more pictures, this time from Gill and Peter Regan's garden, not too far from the first one but in this case a mature (40 years old) woodland garden, gardened in a very natural way. Gill has a great interest in lilies and these are a few examples:

L. martagon cattaniae - a stunning deep mahogany-red form with very glossy petals
L. martagon hybrid - curious almost bicoloured form
L. monadelphum - I think one of the most beautiful lilies in the world. A Turkish species which I have tried to grow several times but never achieving its full potential. Gill and Peter's garden is on quite heavy clay soil with flints and holds moisture well into the summer.
General view of martagons self-seeding.

The garden has many other fascinating plants:

Nice combination of Indigofera potaninii and Clematis 'Etoile Rose'
A rather extraordinary shrub which I have only seen a couple of times - Coriaria terminalis var. xanthocarpa

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Apologies for the lack of photos - they didn't get through properly.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I feel at home in those gardens, Tim! Some familiar plants there. However no lilies has started blooming here yet.

I have a large patch of Impatiens omeiana. It is a very hardy but late flowering plant I often the flowers are damaged by frost in November.

Picture taken some years ago.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I used to be more of a tree and shrub man myself, but one can only grow so many of these "space hogs" in a half acre lot (and at my parents' home).  I tried Pterostyrax hispida, but it didn't survive my cold winter, even as a "herbaceous" die back plant, like Paulonia does.  While I still have many unusual woody materials (at least for my climate), I've branched out into alpines, unusual perennials, and species lilies and iris.  They take up a lot less room.  Impatiens omeiana has been on my seed wish list for a while now.

Those are some nice photos, Tim.  One of the first lilies I grew from seed was Lilium monadelphum var. szovitsianum (L. szovitsianum).  But it was certainly not the first lily to bloom that I grew from seed.  It took seven years!  (Apparently, not uncommon for the species.)  The fifth and sixth years I thought it would surely bloom, being 3 feet tall, but no.  Mine grows in rich clay based soil, and it seems quite adaptable and long lived.  I have a few other accessions of the monadelphum species coming from seed now too.  Of the hypogeal germinating group of lily species, I have found them to be the easiest to germinate.

         Lilium szovitsianum

             

         Lilium monadelphum collected in Georgia.
The tiny bulb that the seed produces the season before top growth begins:

             

People tell me that the real Lilium martagon var. cattaniae is very very dark, and I'm not sure if the one in your pic is true, Tim.  
http://www.the-genus-lilium.com/martagon.htm  
There are many imposters in the trade.  I have the variety from three different sources of seed.  Only one has flowered so far: it is a beauty, but not dark enough to be the real cattaniae.  

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Rick - Gill wasn't sure if it was true cattaniae but it is much darker than other martagons in the garden and it is difficult to know what other name to give it. I don't know them well enough to have an idea of the natural variation. On the SRGC site is a picture of a form with pale undersides to the petals, but really dark outers. In the garden it really does stand out and I must cadge a bit of seed.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Howey
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-05-17

Tim - I too am rejoicing in Pterostyrax hispida which is blooming for the first time in my garden.  There was one growing at the University here - misnamed - but, owing to neglect and the constant construction going on - it dwindled and last time I looked had died out altogether.  However, the seeds were copious so a friend and I collected and started plants.  Haven't seen them anywhere else - my little tree is about 4 feet now - I was so happy to see your photo of it on this Forum. Fran

Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

I used to be more of a tree and shrub man myself, but one can only grow so many of these "space hogs" in a half acre lot (and at my parents' home).  I tried Pterostyrax hispida, but it didn't survive my cold winter, even as a "herbaceous" die back plant, like Paulonia does.  While I still have many unusual woody materials (at least for my climate), I've branched out into alpines, unusual perennials, and species lilies and iris.  They take up a lot less room.  Impatiens omeiana has been on my seed wish list for a while now.

I still am a tree and shrub man but have been sustained with firewood in 25 years! Some of the trees I planted have achieved great proportions.

Rick, my Impatiens omeiana never has time to mature seeds before heavy frosts but I can send you rhizomes if that is possible?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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