Epimedium 2011

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WimB
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Peter wrote:

Our 'gnats' are actually called Black Flies, which are sometimes referred to as 'Buffalo Gnats' since they have a sort of hump in their back. They are small, black blood sucking insects which are actually more painful and irritating than mosquitoes because the females literally slash the skin and lick up the blood as it pools. Black flies breed in flowing water from rivers and streams. After mating the female deposits the fertilized eggs on rocks or other substrate in swift flowing water. Larvae emerge from eggs and develop aquatically, feeding on algae and organic matter flowing by in the moving water. In 7-10 days they develop into pupae. Adults emerge from the pupal case through a slit and float to the surface on a bubble of air. Emerging adults live from 2-3 weeks. They are usually found from spring through fall, with the greatest numbers appearing in the late spring and summer. They are active during the day, with peak activity in the morning and early evening. Here in MA we get them for about 1 month, and for that period, insect repellent is essential, unless you are a masochist.

I'm finally learning how to take pictures, given the necessity of not embarrassing myself here on the Forum. I may even get a better camera, and possibly even take a few lessons! Here is E. brevicornu, about 3 years old, growing in east end of my garden, with morning and late afternoon sun.

No gnats over here, from what you guys have told, I'm very glad we don't have them over here!

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

WimB
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

McDonough wrote:

Wim: following up on your request, here is a photo showing the face-view of the flowers on "Mark's Star" ;D  Clean white inside.

Very nice Mark, I'd buy a 'Mark's Star' ;D if it were for sale, it's one of the best hybrids you have shown here. Although the cross between 'Princess Susan' and 'Freckles' is very nice too.

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Mark, a nursery here in Holland have listed a number of epimediums in their catalogue and I wonder if they exist or well-labelled.
Please help me to find out and give your opinion.

Epimedium warleyense 'Koper" and Epimedium lilacinum. Are they fairytale epimediums?
Epimedium "Creeping Yellow" This is interesting. It's listed by a nursery in Lilliesleaf, Scotland. I tried to visit this nursery last year, when I was on a vacation in Scotland, but the nursery didn't exist anymore. What happened with this epimedium. Could it appear now in Holland? I saw it also somewhere in the US.
Epimedium "Violet Queen". Maybe there is an Epimedium sempervirens "Violet Queen" PDN perhaps?

And for fun, 2 pictures of my young plant Epimedium wushanense "Caramel", blooming for the first time

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Gerrit, that foliage is way cool!  ;D

I would grow it just for that!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Gerrit, will reply as soon as I can, hopefully this weekend.  Next week I'm off-site traveling to various sites for work, and this weekend is 200% booked, must prepare for a conference where I'm presenting (also for work).  I think I liked being unemployed much better.  Please bear with me.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

gerrit wrote:

Mark, a nursery here in Holland have listed a number of epimediums in their catalogue and I wonder if they exist or well-labelled.
Please help me to find out and give your opinion.

Epimedium warleyense 'Koper" and Epimedium lilacinum. Are they fairytale epimediums?
Epimedium "Creeping Yellow" This is interesting. It's listed by a nursery in Lilliesleaf, Scotland. I tried to visit this nursery last year, when I was on a vacation in Scotland, but the nursery didn't exist anymore. What happened with this epimedium. Could it appear now in Holland? I saw it also somewhere in the US.
Epimedium "Violet Queen". Maybe there is an Epimedium sempervirens "Violet Queen" PDN perhaps?

And for fun, 2 pictures of my young plant Epimedium wushanense 'Caramel', blooming for the first time

I believe E. warleyense 'Koper' is a language-translation issue, and not a valid cultivar.  The only links to the name source as Romanian, and google comes up with such terms as "koper-oranje" describing the flowers... I have to believe this is just language semantics and not an actual cultivar name.

The name E. "lilacinum" seems to be applied to either E. glandiflorum 'Lilacinum' or E. x youngianum 'Lilacinum'. Prossibly inconsequential and not worth troubling over.

E. 'Creeping Yellow' represents dubious marketing... the plant a rather mundane white-flowered plant, but "gets its name from foliage that is pale yellowish-green". It is reported to have "emerging leaves rimmed with copper and bronze and mottled with red speckles."  The name "creeping yellow" seems misleading or a poor choice. :(
http://www.stonyfordcottagenursery.co.uk/epimedium-creeping-yellow-bare-...
http://www.munchkinnursery.com/shopping/shopexd.asp?id=57

Your Epimedium wushanense 'Caramel' is awesome, I want to obtain this one badly!

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

A hurried post, last year I selected a very small Epimedium hybrid seedling with tiny light pink flowers, but it's the neat clump of speckled foliage that is an interest... I like it:

So many Epimedium have flowered, are in flower, and ready to flower; I hope to catch up.  Here's one that I don't think I've shown before, E. grandiflorum 'Circe' (left); really nice bright flowers above the foliage.  Also, a first glimpse at the late-to-emerge high alpine selection of E. grandiflorum named 'Cranberry Sparkle' (right); both are Garden Vision Epimedium introductions.  Cranberry Sparkle has flower buds are dark-red-purple from above, an awesome cultivar.

The next two views show another 3-year hybrid that I like, with light white-pink sepals from above, but purplish-plum petals and center, catching my eye.  Will wait to see how it clumps up in years 4-5 to make a determination.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

What an amazing sight your garden must be!!  :o  From these little snippets of photos, it looks simply fantastic!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Thanks Lori, I'll be posting some general garden views this weekend... the Epimediums make it easy for the garden to look nice ;)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Mark, I agree with Lori!
You can't sleep much or watch the telly - both attending to your work and to your beautiful garden!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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