Epimedium 2010

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Continuing series - Part 2: Garden Vision Epimediums nursery in Hubbardston, Massachusetts, USA - Darrell Probst Epi-Jedi Master, Karen Perkins Owner/Proprietor/Horticulturalist. 

1-2  Many beds of epimedium at the nursery are labelled "Epimedium hybrids under trial".  One that caught my attention, although evidently one not considered as good enough (because it hasn't been "flagged") was this one with frilled pink and white sepals, and broad and chunky yellow cup and spurs.

3-8  More "Epimedium hybrids under trial", this grouping all looked akin to Darrell's newest hybrids 'Domino' and 'Pink Champagne'... the colors were delicious.  Unfortunately, many of the photos came out poorly (blurred) due to gusty winds, so I cannot show the complete range of colors seen.  Some of the paler cream and yellow ones were exquisite, but you'll get an idea about the color possibilities.

9-10 Among the more dramatic Epimedium hybrids are those where Darrell's E. sp. nov 'Spine Tingler' is the parent, forming amazing compact mounds of extra narrow spine-edged, wavy-margined, glossy leaves, burnished and shaded with copper and red tones.  It would be worth growing for the foliage alone, but the large yellow spiderflowers are good too.

To be continued.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Fantastic leaves on the 'Spine Tingler' hybrids!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Reed
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-10-09

Here is my Epimedium simplicifolium a bit rugged after having my Maple tree removed. I am always on the lookout for the other two known species with single leaflets. I was finally able to get this one to cross with my Species E. wushanense and set seed. I cant wait to see if it worked out to be a good cross. 

Albany, Oregon USA. Pacific Northwest, elevation approximately 200ft zone 8. Winter wet and Summer Dry. Hot enough to ripen the peaches.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

A nice one, E. simplicifolium is relatively new and rare in cultivation. It was listed in the Garden Vision Epimediums 2009 catalog for $125, but not listed in 2010.  A bit pricey for me.  Good luck with your hybrid seed... as you know most Epimedium are self sterile so if you get seed, they will be hybrids, that's the exciting part.  I know E. elachyphyllum is another of the simple-leaf species, what is the second one?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Reed
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-10-09

Well I can tell you that I didn't pay $125.00 (I have good friends and we share). I got mine two years ago as a 1 gal plant but it is slow to establish. as of the other species of Epi. with one leaflet I dindnt know of E. elachyphyllum so that means 4 have only one the other three are E. baojinense, E. glandulosopilosum, E. zhushanese.

Albany, Oregon USA. Pacific Northwest, elevation approximately 200ft zone 8. Winter wet and Summer Dry. Hot enough to ripen the peaches.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I didn't know epimediums are self infertile.  Do you know if this is true for all species of the genus?  (That is, at least what is known so far.)  For instance, Lilium spp. are generally self infertile, but there are several exceptions.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Reed
Reed's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-10-09

Yes it is as is known thus far; however, sometimes there are several seedling in a single clump that could lead people to believe this not to be true. I am sure that there are some exceptions. Podophyllum are the exact same you need two plants to get seeds.

Albany, Oregon USA. Pacific Northwest, elevation approximately 200ft zone 8. Winter wet and Summer Dry. Hot enough to ripen the peaches.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

In the 2010 Garden Vision Nursery, there was a a new offering named Epimedium sp. nov. 'Smidgeon' described as "the tiniest of all Epimedium in our collections at only 4-5" in height. And as yet, unnamed species. It starts its flowering when only 2" tall.  The only self-fertile species of Epimedium that we have come across to date, it is related to E, platypetalum, but is clump forming."

I've had my doubts too, as I will get seed set on species, like E. rhizomatosum, with scattered flowers in July for example, but the only other Epimedium blooming (membranaceum, hybrids of it, and occasional few out-of-season flowers) would be about 300' away on the other side of the house.  However, I do think the bees are just doing their job, cross-pollinating flowers even if relatively far away.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

James wrote:

Yes it is as is known thus far; however, sometimes there are several seedling in a single clump that could lead people to believe this not to be true. I am sure that there are some exceptions. Podophyllum are the exact same you need two plants to get seeds.

Thanks, Mark, and

Hah!  That explains it:  I had two nice plump Podophyllum hexandrum fruits, both with only one seed each, and one was non-viable.  I have a few widely dispersed plants in the garden, and I am not even sure they bloomed simultaneously.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Observing a large batch of 3 year old Epimedium seedlings, I'm having some interesting results.  The most important realization came this summer with prolonged heat and drought that devastated the foliage on many (most) Epimedium grandiflorum and youngianum cultivars, with almost all foliage toasted to a crisp, those hybrid plants that had evergreen species in their lineage, such as sempervirens and pubigerum, laughed at the drought and looked as deep green and fresh as they did in spring.

I'm particularly excited by a batch of seedlings from E. youngianum 'Liliputian', one of the smallest varieties with white flowers, which crossed with some nearby evergreen species; either pubigerum, sempervirens 'Candy Hearts', or x sasakii (itself, a natural dyphyllum x sempervirens cross).  The resulting plants are all very dark green, evergreen, compact, and drought-tolerant.  One plant is particularly small, a real dwarf with concise leaves and tiny evergreen leaflets smaller than a fingernail.

1    Epimedium - evergreen 'Liliputian' hybrids in front row
2    E. selected dwarf evergreen 'Liliputian' hybrid, showing the brace of tiny evergreen leaves at the base, basal leaves only about 1" tall
      (it is my belief that the evergreen parent is E. pubigerum)
3    E. membranaceum x rhizomatosum cross, not great, but flowered all summer long, even in the drought.  Here, flowering in September.
4    E. membranaceum - 2 year old hybrid seedling, can't wait until spring!

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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