Epimedium 2010

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Part 3,

21    E. x versicolor 'Versicolor' - rich red semi-evergreen foliage, and the ever-widening mat of E. pinnatum ssp. colchicum 'Thunderbolt' with superb evergreen foliage, deepening to near black in winter, highlighted by green venation.

22    E. x youngianum 'Otome'- one of the very best youngianum types, this one surely with some sempervirens in its genetic makeup.  Beautiful rounded, deeply veined evergreen leaves that take on various leaf colors throughout the year, build into a superb upright clump.  Epimedium x sasakii 'Melody' just behind it, another evergreen one.

23    E. x youngianum 'Grape Fizz' - a 2004 introduction by Darrell Probst, a terrific small plant with sprightly flowers that can appear all summer, taking on russet red leaf colors in fall.

24    E. fangii - not a particularly showy plant in flower, nor fall color, but an interesting species nonetheless, with stout, leathery, 3-part leaves.  Spreads by long rhizomes, so needs to be placed carefully. Possibly useful for hybridization for the plant habit, leaf disposition, and yellow flower color.

25    E. grandiflorum f. flavescens - No.2 - Darrell Probst numbers his various collections of forma flavescens, this one show some dessicated leaves on top from our summer drought, but was more tolerant of drought than most other flavescens forms.  Also unique in growth; very large, with bold textured leaves, yellow in autumn.

26    Epimedium hybrid seedling - 2 year, showing some interesting fall color and venation.

27    Epimedium hybrid seedling - 3 year, unflowered so far, keeping an eye on this one as it is among the most dwarf of my eppies so far, evergreen, with red leaves in spring, and deep bronze foliar color in autumn.

28    Epimedium hybrid seedling - 3 year, probably a seedling from youngianum 'Otome', with shiny veined leaves, great clumping habit, and attractive autumn color.

29    E. grandiflorum 'Bicolor Giant' - relatively new to my garden, has good red fall foliage.

30    E. pubescens "Shaanxi Forms" - introduced by Darrell Probst, a hardy selection of this slightly more tender species. Very low, wide clump of neat foliage, much smaller than E. stellulatum that can be seen just above.  perky white flowers above the foliage.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Woodard
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-11-29

Ver nice. That's an impressive clump of 'Thunderbolt'. I look forward to seeing more of your seedlings as they mature; as you've implied before, Mark, we've only seen the tip of the iceberg with these wonderful and variable plants!

Joseph Woodard, just west of Nashville, TN. USDA zone 6b, but more like 7 or so in recent years.

Woodard
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-11-29

A few photos from spring '09, mostly of 'no-name' seedlings.

Seedlings from 'Caramel'. The best of them are extremely floriferous (500+ on still-maturing plants) with upright flower stalks. Some flower stalks are lax and bend though, which is personally not my preference.

Some variation. Notice that one has green anthers, which is fairly uncommon (e.g. E. chlorandrum and a couple of others).

An exciting and seemingly vigorous seedling from E. davidii.

Some seedlings from E. dolichostemon.

E. x youngianum 'Yenomoto' and an open-pollinated seedling from it (notice the blush of pink that is not present in the seed-parent).

Some self-sown seedlings that will likely bloom in '11  (if they haven't already; I missed the spring '10 season being abroad)

Joseph Woodard, just west of Nashville, TN. USDA zone 6b, but more like 7 or so in recent years.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

When I look at your photos, Mark and Joseph, I am very sorry that I haven't yet been able to increase my collection! As I have told before, it is likely slugs to blame for that. They devour the shoots in spring. And, of course, the difficulty in obtaining other species than the common ones here.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Joseph wrote:

A few photos from spring '09, mostly of 'no-name' seedlings.

Seedlings from 'Caramel'. The best of them are extremely floriferous (500+ on still-maturing plants) with upright flower stalks. Some flower stalks are lax and bend though, which is personally not my preference.

Some tantalizing stuff there Joseph!  I don't yet have 'Caramel', but must get a piece sometime, along with 'Amber Queen' which is a real beauty: http://www.plantdelights.com/Catalog/Plants/Epimedium-Amber-Queen-PP-171...
Walking the rows upon rows at Garden Vision Epimediums nursery, there are entire rows of plants with these giant spider blooms in all sorts of caramel, tan, pink, and rose colors, simply wonderful.  Wow, 500 bloom on one plant!  You second hybrid plant from dolichostemon looks similar to the named hybrid 'Amanogawa' (acuminatum x dolichostemon), white flowers with yellowish-brown spurs and cup, which I showed earlier in this thread:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=178.msg1973#msg1973

After spending so much on these plants over the years, now that I have a couple hundred varieties, I'm thinking to myself, why keep buying them, why not start hybridizing my own plants and grow them from seed.   They're all charming, even those that don't get named, they are still beautiful plants in the garden.

This year I planted out about 250 self-sown seedlings, labeling them as to what plant and area they were found under, fun to see what one gets.  I have many parallel cases like your pink-blushed youngianum 'Yenomoto' seedling, where the hybrid seedling closely resembles the parent, but with a subtle twist.  So, it pays to surround your desirable epimediums with "good neighbors".  I have floriferous grandiflorum forms 'Larchmont' and 'Pseudo-Larchmont' growing near E. grandi. f. flavescens 'La Rocaille', and one gets plants perfectly intermediate, grandiflorum-like plants with light pink and pale yellow flowers.  It was pure serendipity that I planted the tiny youngianum 'Liliputian' near a number of desirable epimedium species & cultivars, getting very dwarf and distinctive plants that are fully evergreen imparted from either E. sempervirens 'Candy Hearts', E. pubigerum, and E. x sasakii (natural hybrid of sempervirens and setosum).

Self-sown epimedium seedlings are the cutest little things, I don't have the heart to toss them out until I see what they produce in 2-3 years.  This spring I had a batch of about 150 3-year old seedlings bloom, I selected those I wanted to keep, and gave the rest away to our local Garden Club in town, the ladies were thrilled with these donations.  Also this past year, I potted up, then planted out about 200 more self-sown seedlings.  Spring of 2011, if I get even fair germination on my 50 flats of manually made crosses, I should have more epimediums than I know what to do with.

Trond: I have never seen a slug munching on any "eppies" here, although we don't have much of a problem with them here, but they do exist, particularly in the more woodsy areas where the epimediums are planted.  I have friends in Seattle Washington area, Pacific Northwest USA, wher giant slugs reign supreme, but they do grow epimediums there too.  You might need some regime of slug bait application to mitigate their damage.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Woodard
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-11-29

Mark, I'm sure a visit to Garden Vision would blow my mind. I'd like to visit, and I'm very glad it's still around. I didn't receive a catalogue this year that I recall. Do they still publish one? In the past they have generally sent it out automatically.

I don't have 'Amber Queen' either, but it's what I think of every time I see my seedlings bloom. I did see a whole bed of them at a botanical garden in Korea, though. They looked smaller and weaker than mine, but I can't judge based on that because, though blooming size, they were obviously recent additions. Incidently, there was also a bed of E x 'Pink Champagne', so I was able to see that one in the flesh before taking the plunge. Do you have it (I assume so)? I like plants like it and 'Domino', which hold the flowers high above the foliage. I have noticed that the color of the flowers are not as intense as I had expected. That goes with the territory though . . .

It sounds like your "eppy" program is off and running. It's all still quite new to me.

Joseph Woodard, just west of Nashville, TN. USDA zone 6b, but more like 7 or so in recent years.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Yes, Garden Vision Epimediums still publishes a catalog, I did get one for 2010, but it was the first one in a decade where I did not order because of being unemployed :-\.  I was however graced by the generous gift of 'Pink Champagne' and sp. nova "The Giant".  Since Garden Vision Epimediums is now run by Darrell's ex, Karen Perkins,  try emailing her to be sure you get the list this year: epimediums@earthlink.net.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I was googling Epimedium wushanense 'Caramel' tonight, and came across a somewhat unsettling nursery-offering from Heronswood.  They are selling seedling-grown plants from E. wushanense 'Caramel', which will obviously be 100% hybrids and not the true Caramel; fair game I suppose, but the plant offering is listed simply as Epimedium [Caramel], an odd cryptic way to list the offering.  What does it mean?  To be sure, almost every customer who would purchase such an offering will label their plant Epimedium 'Caramel' or Epimedium Caramel, and it'll totally create confusion with the true E. wushanense 'Caramel'; they should know better than such a carelessly labeled offering... how disappointing.  If anyone currently grows the true 'Caramel', start calling it as such; E. wushanense 'Caramel' (true vegetatively propagated plant). Tsk tsk Heronswood.

Heronswood - Epimedium [Caramel]
http://www.heronswood.com/shop/03464

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

Trond: I have never seen a slug munching on any "eppies" here, although we don't have much of a problem with them here, but they do exist, particularly in the more woodsy areas where the epimediums are planted.  I have friends in Seattle Washington area, Pacific Northwest USA, wher giant slugs reign supreme, but they do grow epimediums there too.  You might need some regime of slug bait application to mitigate their damage.

With bigger plants it is no problem but small, newly planted ones are vulnerable in the spring when the new shoots emerge especially if the spring is slow and the slugs are numerous. The very cold winter last year decimated the slug population a lot and the extreme cold this November with no snow-cover may kill off some of the greedyguts. (I hope the few Epimediums I have survive.)
When I acquire new plants either by buying or seeding I will be very careful where to plant them and use slug bait.

The look of all your different plants makes me wish for growing more!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Woodard
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-11-29

Mark, that is an unfortunate reality, and one that is all too common in the trade. And that is an old listing too; they no longer offer those seedlings, which is also unfortunate, and I think they should remove the page (the link has been removed from the catalogue, but you can obviously still reach the page 'through the back door' as you have). The 'former Heronswood' was one of the only sources of seedlings, though, and I wish others would offer them. Perhaps they don't because people like names, and even if you did make it clear (e.g. 'These are seedlings FROM H. wushansense Ogisu 92009, NOT the real thing!'), many consumers would take the liberty of retaining the name anyway, presumably to avoid the complexity of the explanation to fellow friends and gardeners. Either way it's not ideal, and it is certainly unacceptable for anyone who distributes plants, whether commercially or as a hobby. I'm afraid it's probably inevitable though. The upside is that even though this practice can lead to disappointment, it can also lead to pleasant surprises. Given the option, I would always prefer a seedling to a named clone, assuming the two are of equal horticultural merit. To me, plants are no different from pets; it's nice knowing that you have something unique with which to develop a relationship. On the other hand, if you paid $140,000 for a clone of the 9/11 rescue dog, you might want it to be the real thing!  ;D

Joseph Woodard, just west of Nashville, TN. USDA zone 6b, but more like 7 or so in recent years.

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