Don't forget the red ones!

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

You're on the list too, Mark, for verrucosus.  If all goes well, I think it might be easier for you to root cuttings next summer.  That's how I propagated mine.  Likewise, I thought it might be easier for me to root cuttings of planipes, but Dirr only lists propagation from seed for sacalinensis so I'll stick with that for now.  Yes, I'd like to try some seed, with a few different methods of preparation.  Euonymus seed have a very oily coating, and some sources recommend washing in diluted soap first, although Dirr does not mention it.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

You're on the list too, Mark, for verrucosus.  If all goes well, I think it might be easier for you to root cuttings next summer.  That's how I propagated mine.  Likewise, I thought it might be easier for me to root cuttings of planipes, but Dirr only lists propagation from seed for sacalinensis so I'll stick with that for now.  Yes, I'd like to try some seed, with a few different methods of preparation.  Euonymus seed have a very oily coating, and some sources recommend washing in diluted soap first, although Dirr does not mention it.

I'll get plenty of seeds later on europæus, if it is of interest. They germinate easily under the mother plant every year. However, I do not know if the seeds are 1, 2 or more years old when they decide to germinate.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

McDonough wrote:

Looks like I'll have a bumper crop on Euonymus sachalinensis, let me know if anybody wants some.

Mark,
just as well it's also known as E. planipes as it's allowed into Oz under that name! (Yes, please!)

I took these pics before the sun came out so the flowers aren't open fully but quite obvious red! Anemone pavonina - even the white ones have red exteriors. :D

And Tulipa greigii (possibly "Red Riding Hood") is certainly bright in the spring garden.

cheers
fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

A little red darling!
Does it open wide, or stay fairly closed?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

RickR wrote:

A little red darling!
Does it open wide, or stay fairly closed?

Hi Rick,
if you mean the anemone, yes it does, but only in full sun and not at 7am!
Actually, the tulip does the same, too!
cheers
fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

RickR wrote:

A little red darling!
Does it open wide, or stay fairly closed?

Taken at 8am this morning,
Tulipa greigii and Anemone pavonina,
cheers
fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Nice to see spring plants at this time of the year - the rain is pouring down outside!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Here, pushing things right to the limit, is Ipomopsis rubra... In a few fitful previous tries, I was never able to winter it over, but now finally, success...  However, this bit of bloom is all I'll get, since it's getting very late, and this biennial will definitely not be able to set seed before it's killed by the cold.  (Grrr, I remember again why I hate biennials!  ::))

The second photo does shows the frost-bitten flowers looking very red...

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Ipomopsis is a genus that I have not considered trying, but I think I will now!
What's the trouble wintering it over - frost, humidity, lack of warm summers?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Skulski wrote:

Here, pushing things right to the limit, is Ipomopsis rubra... In a few fitful previous tries, I was never able to winter it over, but now finally, success...  However, this bit of bloom is all I'll get, since it's getting very late, and this biennial will definitely not be able to set seed before it's killed by the cold.  (Grrr, I remember again why hate biennials!  ::))

Lori, I love these things, the Ipomopsis (or Gilia, as I used to grow them under).  I've not grown I. rubra, and when I look it up on the USDA site, I can't believe my eyes on it's distribution... it even includes little ol' Massachusetts!  Since the distribution includes Michigan and Ontario, I have to assume some strong level of hardiness.  I had always thought of this as a strictly southern species, or a Texas wildflower, shows what I know ;-)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=IPRU2

I wonder if you might be better off growing I. aggregata or one of its many subspecies, this being the Western version of rubra... perhaps you already grow that one.
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=IPAG
Years ago I used to grow several color forms, and even a few other species from Sally Walker's Southwestern USA collected seed, and the first year biennial rosettes were not only flat, lacy, and tinged with color, they seemed perfectly hardy, and quickly grew the following year with bright display of red, purple, pink, and white.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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