Don't forget the red ones!

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

ITIS claims that Euonymus nana is an "accepted" name, but it seems to be in the minority.  http://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt

I've seen a site that claims "turkestanica" to be a cultivar (not a variety, as I had thought).
At any rate, I'll correct my records - thanks!

Those are attractive plants, Rick and Mark - thanks for posting.  Euonymus are not (yet?) on the invasive weed list here, and I have not yet noticed one as an escape.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

Who is our Botanical Latin "specialist" here?  As I understand, euonymus would be masculine, or possible neuter.  How can nana or turkestanica (both feminine adjectives) be in gender agreement?  My Stearn's book seems to be misplaced, not that I would necessarily get it, anyway.

I am by no way an expert in this matter, but you are right, Rick. I think Euonymus is masculine and hence it's nanus, not nana. According to RHS's New Dictionary of Gardening the correct name is Euonymus nanus 'Turcestanicus'.

E. sachalinensis does ring a bell in the back of my mind as one I have come across in literature, and worthy of ferreting out.  Mark, I though Euonymus spp. were no-nos in you neck of the woods?

E. sachalinensis is synonymous with E. planipes. It is a common garden shrub here although I don't grow it but E. europæus. Another fine Euonymus is E.alatus. The last one has insignificant flowers and fruits but the twigs and the autumn color is outstanding.
All the pics are from last fall (October or November).

E. europæus selfsow a little and I have to remove seedlings every spring.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

One more red, or nearly so. Anemone hupehensis has a kind of red flowers, especially if seen from behind.

Rick, the Euonymus verrucosus is very interesting. Does it set viable seed? Can I ask for some if possible?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

One more red, or nearly so. Anemone hupehensis has a kind of red flowers, especially if seen from behind.

Rick, the Euonymus verrucosus is very interesting. Does it set viable seed? Can I ask for some if possible?

All fall-blooming Anemones fried to a crisp this summer, so no flowers this year, hopefully the plants survive.  I don't grow the hybrids, but only A. tomemtosa, maybe to see it another year.

As to various Euonymus, not sure you caught my comment, but Euonymus alatus is banned and is one the State of Massachusetts Prohibited Plant List due to its invasive spreading by seed. I believe it is similarly banned from a number of US States.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

The pic is of E. verrucosus in a pot.  I would have planted it out in the yard last fall or spring, but a rabbit ate it down to a nub last September.  It had two unripe capsules at the time. I am sure they were very yummy, as were the Styrax americanus seedlings grown from the disjunct population in Illinois.  Out of my hundreds of pots, those were the only two the rabbit ate. :-[  I guess I should be happy that was all he ate!

Anyway, both have rebounded nicely, and E. verrucosus will find itself in a landscape berm next year.  So I expect flowers (and seed) next year, and I'll keep you in mind, Trond.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Anyway, both have rebounded nicely, and Euonymus verrucosus will find itself in a landscape berm next year.  So I expect flowers (and seed) next year, and I'll keep you in mind, Trond.

Me too please.  Looks like I'll have a bumper crop on Euonymus sachalinensis, let me know if anybody wants some.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

McDonough wrote:

Get ready for retina burn with Zauschneria garrettii (or Epilobium canum ssp. garrettii as now known)...  
Most years, it makes a "smattering" of those lovely red-orange trumpets, but this year, perhaps due to the long sizzling dry summer, it looks to be a banner year for bloom.

It's definitely not a banner year for it here, with so little warmth!  Looks like I'll only get a very small smattering of bloom.  (On the other hand, at least it's blooming, while so many other perennials chose not to bloom at all this summer.)  It is usually a very good late-bloomer here, going well into October, weather permitting.

The second photo shows the allegiance to Epilobium quite clearly.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

E. sachalinensis is synonymous with E. planipes. It is a common garden shrub here although I don't grow it but E. europæus.

E. europæus selfsow a little and I have to remove seedlings every spring.

Trond, I missed commenting on Euonymus europaeus... that's quite a display of seed capsules.  In a way, it is better than E. sachalinensis in that it displays the fruit without leaves apparently, so more of an impact, whereas in E. sachalinensis the "fruits" can be partially obscured by the foliage.

Now, checking into the issue of E. sachalinensis being a synonym for E. planipes, I believe the situation is a little different.  Some sites suggest that plants in Horticulture are in reality E. planipes, and that the true E. sachalinensis is not in cultivation, or rarely so.... most plants actually being E. planipes. However, both planipes and sachalinensis are valid species.  The following site says that E. planipes has green flowers, whereas true sachalinensis has brown flowers, so it looks like I have E. planipes if this is true.
http://www.rogerstreesandshrubs.com/gallery/DisplayBlock~bid~9980~gid~~s...

This site says E. sachalinensis has green flowers, mentions E. planipes, but doesn't address the nomenclature or identification issue.
http://en.sl.life.ku.dk/faciliteter/arboretet/maanedensplante/2004/oktob...

And then some sites put it the other way around, E. sachalinensis (syn. E. planipes), and yet other sites say about E. planipes: possibly not distinct from E. sachalinensis?  So which is it?

===============================================
More googling, and one can read the species descriptions of E. sachalinensis and nanus in this Flora of China PDF on the genus Euonymus.  E. sachalinensis does have reddish to purple or brown flowers, so my plant can't be sachalinensis, and E. nanus has whitish-green flowers... so my plant that had red flowers was also misidentified.  In Flora of Japan, E. planipes is described as havingflowers that are white to pale green... my plant is most likely E. planipes.
http://flora.huh.harvard.edu/china/PDF/PDF11/Euonymus.pdf

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Mark, some want to split and some want to merge species! That's normal. I cited RHS's Encyclopedia.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Skulski wrote:

It's definitely not a banner year for it here, with so little warmth!  Looks like I'll only get a very small smattering of bloom.  (On the other hand, at least it's blooming, while so many other perennials chose not to bloom at all this summer.)  It is usually a very good late-bloomer here, going well into October, weather permitting.

The second photo shows the allegiance to Epilobium quite clearly.

You are luckier than me though, Lori. I have never succeeded with  Zauschneria regardless its name.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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