Crocus 2011

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Your "double" also has multiple stamens and stigma sections.  I wonder if that means anything regarding stability?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Your "double" also has multiple stamens and stigma sections.  I wonder if that means anything regarding stability?

It does this year (double stamens/stigma) whereas it was normal last year as can be seen in the 2010 photo.  Not sure what to make of it.  I may tag this one and dig it up and replant to it's own location, to see if the doubling behavior persists.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

McDonough wrote:

It does this year (double stamens/stigma) whereas it was normal last year as can be seen in the 2010 photo.

Are your sure?  I think I count 5 stamens in your 2010 photo...
What am I looking at?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

McDonough wrote:

It does this year (double stamens/stigma) whereas it was normal last year as can be seen in the 2010 photo.

Are your sure?  I think I count 5 stamens in your 2010 photo...
What am I looking at?

You're right Rick, I wasn't looking as closely as I should have.  On the left is a zoomed in view from a different angle (2010 photo).  In addition to 5 stamens it also has a 4-part stigma instead of a 3-part one.  On the right is a new angle closeup (2011 photo), which shows 6 stigma divisions... I will look more closely at it to see if there are two trifid styles or one multi-branched one.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

After two absurdly warm days (near 70 F, 21 C) sunny weather continues but now only in the lower 40s F (~6 C) yet the sun is still warm, and the spring bulbs are literally jumping out of the ground.  Here are some welcome spring crocus.

Usually the first to bloom, but beat out this year by C. biflorus ssp. isauricus, is C. vitellinus.

One of my favorite spring Crocus is C. gargaricus, the buds pop right up out of the soil looking like orange lipstick; the wide open chalices about the brightest orange of any crocus.

Crocus etruscus 'Rosalind' is a selection that I got from Jane McGary, and it is an exquisite Crocus; it literally popped up and started blooming in a single day.

This is a misidentified Crocus, bought as C. minimus, but looking like a C. vernus selection; it is beautiful and welcome whatever it is.

As much as I love species crocus, I've been getting lots of enjoyment scratching in seed of open-pollinated C. chysanthus cultivar seed, the bees no doubt mixing things up, and innumerable hybrid seedlings result in all sorts of colors and variations.  No need to worry about cultivar name; just enjoy the crocus hybrid party.  One of the parents in this area, was C. chysanthus 'Advance', with flowers purplish on the outside and yellow inside, the seedlings give rise to lots of coppery brown colored seedlings; such fun.


Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

What a difference a day makes, a couple inches of snow overnight, views of Crocus gargaricus and C. etruscus 'Rosalind' in snow.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

The sun didn't shine today, stayed cold and gray, so crocus are not opening up.  But for those species that are richly striped or marked on the outside, it's a good opportunity to photograph that characteristic.  Here are three views of Crocus angustifolius.  The first two photos show a patch that is growing in thickly, as each year I scratch in fresh seed around the mother corms.  The seedlings show a little bit of variability, in terms of color and intensity of the feathering, from brown, to purplish such as the flower in the far left (left photo).  The middle photo shows a close-up of the same clump.  The photo on the right is a different clone, one I got from Jane McGary, which grows a bit shorter, and more richly marked with brown.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

the last of my crocus flowering for this season is Crocus pelistericus. This is one that does well for me in my climate.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

A very nice color of that one, Tony!
Can't say the Crocus season is over here yet. Here are some flowering now.

   

Mark, inspired by your discovery I did take a look my Crocuses too and found this 9-petaled one!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Mark and Hoy,

wonderful to see your Crocusses flowering too. Some very nice crosses you have there, Mark.

Tony,

C. pelistericus looks stunning. I've sowed this species last year,I hope to see germination soon now.

And a couple of pics of Crocus veluchensis are included here too. It's one of the last to flower here.

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

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