Beautiful plants in the Dolomites

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IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Booker wrote:

Another selection ...

STAND OF GYMNADENIA

LEONTOPODIUM SCENE - QUITE PLEASED WITH THIS ONE!

 STAND OF GYMNADENIA : what a fine strong clump of the glorious fragrant orchid, Gymnadenia conopsea ---- it is conopsea in the Dolomites, I presume... not some other?

LEONTOPODIUM SCENE - QUITE PLEASED WITH THIS ONE!
: too right.... what's not to be pleased about!??

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Thanks folks ... Mark, the landscapes are magnificent and quite unlike any other mountains we have visited.  The pink cushions are mainly Gypsophila repens and the allium-like flowers are either Carduus defloratus ssp. defloratus or a dwarf Cirsium sp.
The only alliums we have seen in the Dolomites are Allium schoenoprasum ssp. alpinum; A. victorialis and A. insubricum (and then only twice in the case of A. insubricum).

ALLIUM SCHOENOPRASUM ssp. ALPINUM

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

IMYoung wrote:

Booker wrote:

Another selection ...

STAND OF GYMNADENIA

LEONTOPODIUM SCENE - QUITE PLEASED WITH THIS ONE!

 STAND OF GYMNADENIA : what a fine strong clump of the glorious fragrant orchid, Gymnadenia conopsea ---- it is conopsea in the Dolomites, I presume... not some other?

LEONTOPODIUM SCENE - QUITE PLEASED WITH THIS ONE!
: too right.... what's not to be pleased about!??

There are also Gymnadenia odoratissima in these mountains but these are, as you say, a shortish, but fine stand of G. conopsea.

I was 'quite pleased about that particular shot of the eidelweiss' because profile shots of very thin-stemmed blooms such as these  can be difficult to capture at the best of times but in this instance the wind was intermittently howling and the rock was surrounded by nettles, thistles and other foliar dissuasions. Still bearing the scars ... !!

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Quote:

I was 'quite pleased about that particular shot of the eidelweiss' because profile shots of very thin-stemmed blooms such as these  can be difficult to capture at the best of times but in this instance the wind was intermittently howling and the rock was surrounded by nettles, thistles and other foliar dissuasions. Still bearing the scars ... !!

Often the case that one must suffer for the sake of art, Cliff!  ;)

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Sellars
Sellars's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-29

Anne:

They are spectacular photos.  I can understand why you go back there every year.

I was interested to read that you are using a compact digital camera.  I am convinced that they are much better for alpine flower photography than DSLR (digital single-lens reflex) cameras.  Apart from the lighter weight and ease of use they have a far superior depth of field because of the smaller image sensor. As a result more of the flower is in focus and it is often feasible to get the background in focus as well as the flower.  I am currently using a Sony DSC HX1.

David Sellars
From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada

Feature your favourite hikes at:
www.mountainflora.ca
MountainFlora videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/MountainFlora

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Cliff, all your photos are worth making postcards of!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

David wrote:

Anne:

They are spectacular photos.  I can understand why you go back there every year.

I was interested to read that you are using a compact digital camera.  I am convinced that they are much better for alpine flower photography than DSLR (digital single-lens reflex) cameras.  Apart from the lighter weight and ease of use they have a far superior depth of field because of the smaller image sensor. As a result more of the flower is in focus and it is often feasible to get the background in focus as well as the flower.  I am currently using a Sony DSC HX1.

Hi David.  I know you've been in the Dolomites and can understand how beautiful everything is, more beautiful than the photos show.  Alan Bradshaw of Alplains Seeds was our houseguest once, and when I told him how much I admired his pictures, he showed me the camera he was using.  I wrote everything down and Joe and I made the camera our next purchase.  What a blessing it was to leave the old camera home with all its lenses etc.  It was quite heavy.  We don't normally use a tripod with this but we do carry a mini-tripod which is quite good when used for close-ups taken lying down.  Those are usually the ones I take, including the ones taken of Ranunculus seguirei in the manure field! Cliff Booker showed Joe how to get backgrounds in focus but I think the camera Cliff uses has more bells and whistles. 

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Spiegel wrote:

David wrote:

Cliff Booker showed Joe how to get backgrounds in focus but I think the camera Cliff uses has more bells and whistles.  

More bells and whistles perhaps, Anne ... but still a tone deaf musically challenged operator!   :D

I insist that my best images were taken using a 3.4 megapixel Nikon 995 ... with a tiny image sensor and minute lens.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Sellars
Sellars's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-29

Anne:

We were back in the Strawberry Mountains in Oregon a few weeks ago revisiting some of the places we went together on the NARGS 2003 expedition.  It was on that trip that you "sold" us on visiting the Dolomites!

The flowers on Strawberry Mountain were a bit late this year and although we were there at about the same time as in 2003 we were too early to see the Epilobium obcordatum and Collomia debilis in flower.  But there were some nice Phlox and stunning Claytonia megarhiza.

David Sellars
From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada

Feature your favourite hikes at:
www.mountainflora.ca
MountainFlora videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/MountainFlora

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

David, I remember that trip.  Beautiful plants and an astragalus I could not identify, most frustrating.  And I do recall discussing the Dolomites with you, and later hearing that you went there.  Lovely pictures - were you too early for the Penstemon spatulatus?

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