Beautiful plants in the Dolomites

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

More great stuff Anne, really like the orchid pics, particularly Nigritella.  I had to show my wife some of the stunning scenery photos, the shot of Rifugio is hard to believe!!! I'm aching to go there!

Couple questions on your pics, is photo #539 an Anaphalis?  And 543-Thlaspi, is this really an Erysimum?

My goodness, the compact alpine perfection of Ranunculus seguieri is amazing, certainly on par with the famed New Zealand Ranunculids.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

539 looks like a Saussurea alpina. Here is an example from Norway.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

McDonough wrote:

More great stuff Anne, really like the orchid pics, particularly Nigritella.  I had to show my wife some of the stunning scenery photos, the shot of Rifugio is hard to believe!!! I'm aching to go there!

Couple questions on your pics, is photo #539 an Anaphalis?  And 543-Thlaspi, is this really an Erysimum?

My goodness, the compact alpine perfection of Ranunculus seguieri is amazing, certainly on par with the famed New Zealand Ranunculids.

  Mark, the 539 is a Sausssurea, probably alpina.  The other is definitely not a Thlaspi and probably an Erysimum.  I'm not great at putting the names on the pictures, and I couldn't find my notes.

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

P.S. to Mark.  I've never seen Ranunculus seguieri as we saw it this year, which is another way of saying the mountains are never the same, my standard answer to people who are shocked we keep going back to the same place year after year.  I think Cliff would agree: it's always different.  I have to admit that lying down on 6" of straw and manure would not normally be my idea of fun but most of it was quite dry.  I just thought it would be good to show how some alpines  respond to fertilizer.  The flowering was really incredible (this is usually a plant of limestone screes), but the plants maintained their compactness.
More pictures later and then I hope that Cliff will weigh in with pictures of what everything looked like the two weeks after we left.

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

RickR wrote:

Sensational is right, Anne!  Especially like the variation of Rhodiola with the red accents.  I didn't know R. glacialis was more than just white.  Thanks again.

Rick, I'm so glad that you mentioned the Rhodiola.  I think they're quite fancy and they seem to be stepchildren among the alpines.  We have some in the Rockies which are gorgeous.

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Odds and ends - pictures of plants seen on various days that I don't think are duplicates of plants already shown.  On any given day we would see gentians and other wonderful plants but it's possible you might get bored seeing them in each post.  I never get bored seeing them in person!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Wow, I love the Potentilla nitida and the Oxytropis, especially.  I started the former from seed this year - would that it could ever reach the glory of those in your photos!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Skulski wrote:

Wow, I love the Potentilla nitida and the Oxytropis, especially.  I started the former from seed this year - would that it could ever reach the glory of those in your photos!

Lori, I haven't had much luck with Potentilla nitida (three blooms after three years in the garden and then it died from exhaustion), but that may have had a lot to do with the fact that this is a very dry garden.  Oxytropis jacquinii, on the other hand, blooms beautifully in the garden and maintains its alpine stature at 250' above sealevel.  The foliage remains excellent, no mold or mildew despite terrible humidity, and it is very floriferous.  It lasted 6 years before dying during this terrible weather year.

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Sorry Anne, but would you please check your last image ... the foliage is much more R. seguieri than R.alpestris from this perspective?

MMcD edit: photo renamed to Ranunculus seguieri.  :)

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Booker wrote:

Sorry Anne, but would you please check your last image ... the foliage is much more R. seguieri than R.alpestris from this perspective?

Just checked the picture, Cliff, and of course you're absolutely right.  I just changed the name tag.  That picture is R. seguieri.  Attached is the real Ranunculus alpestris, which was hiding in the computer.  Please start showing your pictures.  I really want to see what things looked like in the next two weeks since we saw mostly the earliest things.

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