amazing Apiaceae (the umbellifers)

93 posts / 0 new
Last post
Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-08-27

Please do, Tim - I'll collect what seed I can...

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

No new ones - I remain totally unable to grow umbellifers from seed!  >:(  - just some of the old ones in bloom:
Athamanta turbith ssp. haynaldii:

Pimpinella major 'Rosea':

Peucedanum ostruthium 'Daphnis':
 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Lori wrote:

No new ones - I remain totally unable to grow umbellifers from seed!  >:(  - just some of the old ones in bloom:

I have exactly two seedlings of Cymopterus (planosus, I think) from Alplains seed two years ago...lol.. several Angelicas from StephenB did nothing for me, but Anthriscus Ravenswing from Kristl did germinate well, and I have a couple doing well in ground- tried a drier spot which died over winter and a wetter spot which is doing well, no sign of flowers yet, though!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

This umbellifer, Angelica sylvestris, was very busy starting flowering before the umbel had cleared from the sheath. The first picture is from yesterday, the other from today.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Trond - Angelica sylvestris isn't seen too much in gardens, much less than the culinary A. archangelica, but has sported to produce deep purple leaved forms like Anthriscus sylvestris 'Ravenswing'. Rather stunning specimens, but because they are biennial they come and go and don't self-seed with the freedom of cow parsley.

Cohan - will be interested to know how you get on with the Cymopterus - so far I have germinated quite a number but not managed to grow them on well. I think they need the same treatment as many bulbs - so really summer dry as they aestivate naturally. The smaller species are the most striking but the larger probably the ones easiest to grow. Are they grown at Denver at all I wonder?

Lori - if I have my own seed I sow it in the autumn and usually get good germination the following spring. I think the oily nature of the seed tends to make it more hydrophobic as it dries out and older seed can be really slow and difficult to come up, if at all. Late sown seed I often put in the fridge for 4 to 6 weeks and this has been quite good for Lomatium and Cymopterus, in fact they sometimes begin to germinate in the fridge as I have also found with Eriogonum. I am aiming to write something on the family so really want to learn a lot more about the American species.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Tim wrote:

Trond - Angelica sylvestris isn't seen too much in gardens, much less than the culinary A. archangelica, but has sported to produce deep purple leaved forms like Anthriscus sylvestris 'Ravenswing'. Rather stunning specimens, but because they are biennial they come and go and don't self-seed with the freedom of cow parsley.

Tim, I haven't planted A sylvestris but I haven't removed it either ;)

Both A sylvestris and archangelica are native here and archangelica is a weed. I remove hundreds every year but let some grow as they are important for some butterfly caterpillars and the plant belongs to the shore.
Purple leaved forms had been interesting though!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Is Angelica sylvestris then the same as Anthriscus sylvestris?
Anthriscus sylvestris Ravenswing is not that large here yet, but assuming I get flowers and seeds, I'll have to make sure to replant some on purpose!

The Cymopterus I have was, I think, sown in 2010, though I think I was too late in spring to get adequate cold stratification, and they germinated last year.. still in the pot and still very tiny.. if I get the bed intended for dryland North Americans finished soon enough (working in that general area- building the alpine stretch now, then a sort of steppe area in front of it) I will plant them out this year..
Can't say I have any great insight to special treatment for them, other than that they will get a highly drained area, and the overall design will hopefully create a bit of a heat sink... Our greatest precip is usually from late May or early June until early to mid July, so time will tell how dry summer plants will do here! I'm hoping our generally cool spring/early summer will be the growing period for that sort of plant and they wont mind the moisture then.... a long hot dry summer is not going to happen here, at least not in recent years' patterns!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

No, Angelica sylvestris and Anthriscus sylvestris are two different plants. They all (including Angelica archangelica) grow here and are a bit weedy.

Another umbellifer here, and much more refined and elegant, is the annual Torilis japonica (it is native despite the epithet).

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-08-27

There's also the variegated Angelica archangelica 'Corinne Tremaine'. Anyone had successs with that one? I've sown seed twice, but the resultant plants have been very weak and haven't survived.

We also have an heirloom Angelica archangelica ssp archangelica v. Majorum, Voss Angelica, a traditional cultivated selection with filled (solid) leaf stalks. You can read about it here: http://www.skogoglandskap.no/filearchive/angelica_fossaa.pdf

Re-Cymopterus - I bought several species from Alplains this year but I was probably also a bit late like Cohan and only one seedling has appeared so far...

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Truth be known quite a number of umbels are weedy!! But they can be very beautiful, like Selinum wallichianum from the Himalayas, which flowers later into the summer and has the most fine foliage of all, or very different, like Thapsia maxima (below) from the south-west Mediterranean. The most extraordinary must be the eryngiums - this one, bourgatii, is widely grown but also very free seeding. The larger colouring flowers with long spiky bracts are actually on a single plant that grew earlier than the rest and could be an interesting variant. I have this planted in a bulb bed which it effectively takes over after the bulbs have flowered and are dying down - I am trying to weed it out of more alpine areas!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Pages

Log in or register to post comments