amazing Apiaceae (the umbellifers)

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Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Lori
I just scattered the seed and let nature take care of the rest. I think stratification will not hurt them. We are so hot and dry in the summer that the seedlings can't sprout so have to wait for spring. It takes a couple of years for them to reach flowering size.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Okay then, by scattering them outside, they are being stratified (exposed to varying temperatures)... good to know.  Thank you!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Really like that Oreoxis and the further details from Mark - these small umbels have the same appeal that the larger herbaceous species have, even if a lot more tricky to grow. I have always sown umbellifer seed in the cooling days of autumn (if I get the seed early enough), so it gets a spell of warm and moist weather, with cooler nights, and then a winter stratification. Usually then germination is pretty good in spring. However, I have had seed sown late and stratified in the fridge germinate still at 4°C in the dark (similarly with eriogonums). This year plants of Lomatium columbianum in our garden set lots of seed so I hope for good germination next year. I find the foliage of these plants irresistable.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Very helpful to read your germination experiences too, Tim.  Thanks.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-08-27

NARGS seed of Lomatium columbianum from 2007 germinated mid-June here (I just sowed the seed in a pot  and stratified in a cold frame outside). However, I lost it the following winter. I have succeeded with 3 or 4 Lomatium species of about 14 species that I've tried here!

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-08-27

cohan wrote:

Some of these remind of several local umbellifers I am fond of, I'll have to dig up pictures--such as the very charming, subtle Sweet Cicely (blunt-fruited; Osmorhiza depauperata) which is common in the woods here.. I sent seed to Stephen, hopefully he gets some babies :)

Unfortunately, there were no babies, perhaps next spring?

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-08-27

Lori wrote:

Here's an update on Peucedanum ostruthium 'Daphnis'... I've gained a bit more appreciation for it since this thread started, and it really is an attractive thing:
[attachthumb=1]

Yes, very nice, but it might also be a bit thuglike too - I've noticed it spread quite far in one season, worth keeping an eye on!

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

The dry (on top of cold, I suppose) conditions here have seemed to keep it in check so far, but I will certainly watch it.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Tim: your picture of Lomatium columbianum is stunning: but white! I have seen this in full bloom in the Columbia River gorge where it is incredibly beautiful (deep rose purple red flowers): your foliage is the same silvery blue, but you must have an albino! I never saw white flowered ones in nature...you may or not be aware this is quite a rare plant in nature. So having an albino (even rarer) is something special. But you need the purple phase too! Most lomatiums are yellow, so white and purple are very cool!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I thought the white flowers were the Athamantha turbith... ?    ???

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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