amazing Apiaceae (the umbellifers)

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

There are so many of these umbellifers that I don't know and never heard of, but I'm paying attention ;)  The Orlaya is pretty, the genus name sounding like it should be a town in Florida or a brand of potato chips :D

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-08-27

I didn't know what it was or what it's family might be when I saw it in seed in the Uppsala (Sweden) botanics a couple of years ago. Good to see it in flower!

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

That certainly seems like strange seed pods for the family.

I have tried to grow Orlaya from seed from another acquaintance in another garden forum.  She gave me so many seeds that I planted them in a pot and directly in soil outside. Nothing ever showed, even in future years.
Any special insights/experiences on this one?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

With me Orlaya self seeds well, except when the rabbits discover it! Generally umbel seed should be sown pretty fresh and will germinate after a period of winter cold. Orlaya is a Mediterranean annual and should germinate with autumn rains if sown early enough, making strong overwintering plants. It sounds like you were just unlucky.

Umbel seeds are marvellously varied and quite a few have hooked spines like Orlaya, especially in dry habitats.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I have grown Orlaya at my summerhouse for many years but I have to sow it regularly.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Thanks, Tim.  Perhaps I will try again sometime.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

It is not such an unusual one as some of those shown here, but Myrrhis odorata is looking nice right now...
   

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Tim wrote:

With me Orlaya self seeds well, except when the rabbits discover it! Generally umbel seed should be sown pretty fresh and will germinate after a period of winter cold. Orlaya is a Mediterranean annual and should germinate with autumn rains if sown early enough, making strong overwintering plants. It sounds like you were just unlucky.

Umbel seeds are marvellously varied and quite a few have hooked spines like Orlaya, especially in dry habitats.

No chance of it self seeding in the wet north west or surviving the winter. Here it is a tender annual which needs to be sown in a warm propagator in spring and grown on in individual pots for planting out now which is what I have just done.Small country vastly varied climate.It is a lovely plant

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Here's an update on Peucedanum ostruthium 'Daphnis'... I've gained a bit more appreciation for it since this thread started, and it really is an attractive thing:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Skulski wrote:

It is not such an unusual one as some of those shown here, but Myrrhis odorata is looking nice right now...

It is a very nice plant and the seeds taste like "King of Denemark" ( a kind of sweeties) but it is one of the worst  weeds here - I have it many places >:( ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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