Allium 2010

81 posts / 0 new
Last post
Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Here are a series of links showing 4 species (all related) that were under consideration for Panayoti's Mongolian Allium ID.  At first I thought it was A. mongolicum, but I'm quite certain it is A. vodopjanovae, a species described by Nikolai Friesen in 1995 splitting off this few-flowered form with semi-nutant flowers from A. mongolicum.  Do check out the Allium mongolicum links, why isn't this species in cultivation... it is the most common onion found growing over most of Mongolia, and really adorable in every way.

Allium bellulum
http://www.bioaltai-sayan.ru/regnum/pict-p/photo/Allium_bellulum_fot.jpg
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/69601.html

Allium mongolicum
species desc: http://greif.uni-greifswald.de/floragreif/?flora_search=Taxon&taxon_id=15
photo record: http://greif.uni-greifswald.de/floragreif/?flora_search=Image&record_id=...
large image:  http://greif.uni-greifswald.de/floragreif/floragreif-content/Kr03/25-08-...
large image2: http://greif.uni-greifswald.de/floragreif/floragreif-content/Kr03/17-08-...
roots & bulb coats: http://greif.uni-greifswald.de/floragreif/?flora_search=Image&record_id=...
http://www.bioaltai-sayan.ru/regnum/pict-p/photo/Allium_mongolicum_fot.jpg
http://www.bjkp.gov.cn/bjkpzc/tszr/zwdg/lsmy/211454.shtml

Allium vodopjanovae
http://www.bioaltai-sayan.ru/regnum/pict-p/photo/Allium_vodopjanovae_fot...

Allium vodopjanovae - zoomable herbarium specimen identified by N. Friesen 2008
http://greif.uni-greifswald.de/floragreif/wp-content/uploads/scan_B12-09...

Allium tenuissimum
http://houmingfei.blogspot.com/2009/04/5_01.html

Update:  I have heard back from Dr. Nicolai Friesen, an expert in the genus Allium in such regions as Siberia and Mongolia, and he confirmed my ID of Panayoti's dwarf pink-flowered Mongolian Allium as A. vodopjanovae.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Here is another allium species photographed in Mongolia by Panayoti Kelaidis in 2009.

This allium is surely A. amblyophyllum (platyspathum ssp. amblyophyllum), a species very close to A. carolinianum (among its synonyms are varieties of A. platyspathum, such as A. platyspathum Schrenk var. falcatum Regel), and also close to A. hymenorrhizum.

Allium carolinianum is not recorded for Mongolia, although A. hymenorrhizum is.

Allium amblyophyllum
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/27709.html
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/17930.html
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/24368.html
...photo showing whole plant, and tapered leaf petioles
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/3178.html

Update:  I have heard back from Dr. Nicolai Friesen, an expert in the genus Allium in such regions as Siberia and Mongolia, and he has identified Panayoti's Mongolian Allium as A. platyspathum.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

A cross between chives and leek! I like it.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I often sow Allium seed in late fall or early winter, but I was surprised to see very quick germination on two species, A. obliquum and A. pseudoflavum.  I didn't expect germination this early, nor do I want germination now, as surely many or most of the seedlings will not persist once the real winter temperatures arrive.  I don't have a greenhouse nor coldframe, so I'm debating whether to bring these two flats to my basement windowsill for the winter.  Thanks to the NARGS & SRGC forumists who shared this seed with me.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Mark, is it not possible to keep the trays outside and cover with dry leaves or another insulation material and a sheet of plastic?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

Mark, is it not possible to keep the trays outside and cover with dry leaves or another insulation material and a sheet of plastic?

Sure, if I decide to leave them out, I would certainly do something to protect them, but given that they germinated just very recently, the seedlings will not have had time to develop any true bulbs, and seedlings will be subject to out right winter kill.  One can sow seed of species like A. flavum and other Codonoprasum section alliums when the seed ripens in July, and they germinate quickly in summer but seedlings will still have at least 3 months to develop and get settled in, then overwinter fine.  From previous experience, I find that late-showing seedlings like these have a very low chance of surviving the full brunt of winter, even with some protection.  I should've sown the seed later in the season  :-\

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Bummer.  I had the same thing happen to me with Allium wallichii last season.  But being single, I can use my house (and my refrigerator) any way I like.  I grew them inside, along with Corydalis wilsonii and Delosperma bosseranum.

I brought my Ranunculus gramineus seeded pot inside before fall temps arrived for exactly that reason, too.  Last season, they germinated in the fall, just as they are supposed to (I discovered), but it was too late to survive the winter, and they didn't make it.  This time, I will start wtheir cool down in February.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

I brought my Ranunculus gramineus seeded pot inside before fall temps arrived for exactly that reason, too.  Last season, they germinated in the fall, just as they are supposed to (I discovered), but it was too late to survive the winter, and they didn't make it.  This time, I will start wtheir cool down in February.

So Rick, did the Ranunculus gramineus fail because you waited too long with the seedlings outdoors, exposed to too much freezing; or because once indoors the warmer temps were not to their liking?  Tonight, I brought my flats of seedlings of both Alliums inside, as it is supposed to go down to 20 F tonight.  I made room for them on my single basement window (I have two basement windows, but only one of them is "mine"  ;)) The problem is, this is a heated space... it's my fully finished basement office that my wife and I share, so the warm temps can be a problem for overwintering plants and seedlings.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

McDonough wrote:

So Rick, did the Ranunculus gramineus fail because you waited too long with the seedlings outdoors, exposed to too much freezing; or because once indoors the warmer temps were not to their liking?  

I waited to long with the seedlings outdoors...

A thought...if it is amenable with your wife, you could box in the window, taking advantage of the cold that seeps through the window, and making it a "cold greenhouse."

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

A thought...if it is amenable with your wife, you could box in the window, taking advantage of the cold that seeps through the window, and making it a "cold greenhouse."

Good one Rick ;D  Not even going to "go there"; some battles are worth fighting for, others aren't.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Pages

Log in or register to post comments