Hardy Succulents - Aizoaceae

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Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Lori
I agree! Disarray is a good description.

Last year I was involved in this same discussion on a cactus and succulent forum. I own two plants that in all respects  are the same species but they came to me labled as separate species. One as congestum the other as basuticum.  I decided to accept the opinion of a very experience collector and  currently use the name D. basuticum (but that could change  :rolleyes:).   

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Do any of you grow Ruschia pulvinaris?
It forms a hard congested mat for me. I have never had it get damaged in my climate. I was wondering how hardy it is in wetter climates.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Weiser wrote:

Do any of you grow Ruschia pulvinaris?
It forms a hard congested mat for me. I have never had it get damaged in my climate. I was wondering how hardy it is in wetter climates.

I can't help you there. But it looks like a plant worth trying!
I have a place (at my summerhouse) where the climate is drier, the summers are warmer and the winters are but a little colder. All your colorful pictures have convinced me that I have to try many more of these plants!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Weiser wrote:

Lori
I agree! Disarray is a good description.

Last year I was involved in this same discussion on a cactus and succulent forum. I own two plants that in all respects  are the same species but they came to me labled as separate species. One as congestum the other as basuticum.  I decided to accept the opinion of a very experience collector and  currently use the name D. basuticum (but that could change  :rolleyes:).   

Here's another link on the same multi-page SRGC thread, member Iann comments on congestum, basuticum, & nubigenum:
http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=3795.msg120597#msg120597

John, the Ruschia looks great too.  Cold has finally hit here, still below freezing as I write this at noontime, we shall see what happens this winter.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Mark, your weather will be warmer the next week!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

What gorgeous plants!  D. basuticum barely survives here outside but does fine in our alpine house where excess winter moisture can be minimized.  I grow several other Delosperma but keep them in my basement window over the winter.

I saw loads of Aizoaceae in South Africa but most were probably not hardy forms.  I didn't see any blooming in the Drakensberg but then I was not there at the peak blooming season.  I did see lots of blooming Helichrysum on the other hand.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

More about Delosperma taxonomy and confusion:
http://www.fgas-sukkulenten.de/downloads/delosperma_e.htm

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Peter George
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-03

I've had D. basuticum for 15 years, and it spreads around a bit each year, and it's seeded itself as well. I've grown D. cooperi for 5 years, and then it was gone after a miserable winter with at least two major thaws accompanied by rain and followed by sub-zero temps. That same year I lost R. pulvinaris as well.

For the past two years I've overwintered a Delosperma from Wrightman's he calls D. 'wolfgang.'  It's tiny and has a very small white flower, which is not really even noticeable in the open garden, but which would be quite at home in a trough.

A neighbor, who has a heated greenhouse, grows several mesembs in the areas around the greenhouse, and they grow beautifully and flower for weeks. I've tried a couple in my sunniest spots, but so far they've failed to make it over the winter. For me, the trick would be to get a nice sunny spot next to my foundation, with perfect drainage. I'll give it a shot this next spring and see if I can expand my Delosperma horizons.

The pictures were taken by Mark McDonough this past spring, and are also found in his 'Garden Visits' thread. The Delosperma was labeled incorrectly around 1998 when I first obtained this particular plant.

Peter George, Petersham, MA (north central MA, close to the NH/VT borders), zones 5b and 6 around the property.

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Delosperma cooperi hybrid ''Kelaidis" (aka "Mesa Verde"). One of my favorites!

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Magnificent plant, many thanks for posting.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

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