Lysimachia lichiangensis

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cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Some interesting plants here.. are these species all plants of wet/damp areas naturally?

I haven't grown any, I'm only familiar with our two local species-and one of those I saw for the first time last year, and only down one road, so hardly an expert on that even!
Lysimachia thyrsiflora; a fairly common plant, I've seen it only in wet semi/wooded and/or grassy areas.. I think it might grow out in the open as well, but I have seen it in some heavily shaded areas; 20-50cm, sounds about right...

     

Lysimachia ciliata,

I saw for the first time last year, only on one road,  in several spots over a few miles, though likely its around in other places..
its reportedly 40-100cm, though many of those I saw were probably more like 20-30, and surely nothing much more than 40-60, if that.. The first patch I saw was in a damp ditch (roadside) which had recently been cleared of trees/brush, leaving the plants growing among grasses etc.

Possibly the plants would prefer a bit more shade.  Likely after a bit more time passes, the other vegetation will grow in taller/more densely, and the Lysimachia will feel more comfortable, as it looked in another nearby spot where they were less exposed... growing with Allium, Geranium, etc

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Thanks for highlighting those Lysimachia species Cohan; I more or less forgot about L. ciliata, which is found here and most of North America.  I've never seen L. thyrsiflora before, a most distinctive species, yet it too is native here based on the USDA Plant Profile pages (links below), I learn something every day :D.  I'll have to keep an eye out for it.  I wonder how such species might perform under garden situations, whether they would become too aggressive and weedy.

Lysimachia thyrsiflora
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=LYTH2

Lysimachia ciliata
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=LYCI

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

The two native Lysimachia spp. we have in Minnesota (L. thyrsiflora and L. quadriflora) are both supposedly moist to wet growers.  I have only seen L. quadriflora myself, and it was definitely in wet conditions.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Mark, I've yet to try either; I have collected seed of L thyrsiflora, but have not sown any; L ciliata I only visited the one time, I did not get back down that road to collect later on....
If I remember correctly, Kristl noted both species as having very limited germination without GA3.. might try them with native, esp wetland, soil...
thyrsiflora at least looks like cuttings might be a possibility as well; it grows on the farm, and even right on my acreage. L ciliata did seem to tend to large stands, no idea how easy it would be to control in the 'garden', but I'd be quite happy to give it a semi-wild area with some of its natural cohorts here--the wild chives it was flowering with in some spots is a nice complement...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

L thyrsiflora is a common native in all Norway too and always grows in wet conditions, bogs (not Sphagnum bogs), shallow shores, moorland etc. It is a nice plant but I don't grow it in my garden. It has very loose, spreading habit quite different from punctata.

I grow L ciliata 'Firecracker! in my garden but it can't compete with the ferns and slugs so it keeps restricted :-\

I also grow L nummularia and the rare native L nemorum. The first one spreads into the lawn but I like it! The second one is very modest and do best in the woodland.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

cohan wrote:

Mark, I've yet to try either; I have collected seed of L thyrsiflora, but have not sown any; L ciliata I only visited the one time, I did not get back down that road to collect later on....
If I remember correctly, Kristl noted both species as having very limited germination without GA3.. might try them with native, esp wetland, soil...
thyrsiflora at least looks like cuttings might be a possibility as well; it grows on the farm, and even right on my acreage. L ciliata did seem to tend to large stands, no idea how easy it would be to control in the 'garden', but I'd be quite happy to give it a semi-wild area with some of its natural cohorts here--the wild chives it was flowering with in some spots is a nice complement...

I think all species of Lysimachia are easily rooted from stem or rhizome cuttings!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Hoy wrote:

L thyrsiflora is a common native in all Norway too and always grows in wet conditions, bogs (not Sphagnum bogs), shallow shores, moorland etc. It is a nice plant but I don't grow it in my garden. It has very loose, spreading habit quite different from punctata.

I grow L ciliata 'Firecracker! in my garden but it can't compete with the ferns and slugs so it keeps restricted :-\

I also grow L nummularia and the rare native L nemorum. The first one spreads into the lawn but I like it! The second one is very modest and do best in the woodland.

Both nice, but L nemora is very cute!

Good to hear about cuttings, will have to try some...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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