Campanula species - various.

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I'm not extremely familiar with C. wanneri, but just from photos, it sure looks just like it.   Were there some other details (besides the longevity) that made it seem to be a possible hybrid? Does the owner of the plant send seeds to the seedex?  I'm always curious if these individuals that act differently than most of their tribe pass on traits like that.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

AmyO
AmyO's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-06

Hi....just back from a nearby hike and happened upon this sweet little Campanula. The flower is really more blue than the photo represents. It was growing in a pretty dry woodland up about 500'. The stem is about 12-14" long and it was a bit sprawling. The foliage is very narrow and about 2-3" long.
I tries finding an ID but the closest I came was C. aparinoides, the marsh bluebell. This was definitley not growing in moist soil.
So any help with an ID would be greatly appreciated! Thanks! :D

Amy Olmsted
Hubbardton, VT, Zone 4

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I'm not familiar with C. aparinoides but here is some more detailed info on it; it seems the inconspicuously toothed leaves may be significant:
http://www.minnesotawildflowers.info/flower/marsh-bellflower

When I zoom in on the photo, I can't make out any toothing on the leaves (not to say it may not be there).

Have you ruled out C. rotundifolia?  The linear upper leaves (only the basal ones are rounded at all) and general flower characteristics, along with the habitat, appear to be a reasonable fit.

Campanula trogerae x betulifolia, with both pink and white flowers:
 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Lori wrote:

I'm not extremely familiar with C. wanneri, but just from photos, it sure looks just like it.   Were there some other details (besides the longevity) that made it seem to be a possible hybrid? Does the owner of the plant send seeds to the seedex?

The flowers tend more toward outfacing, and the inflorescense structure is not blatantly pronounced.  (While unmistakable in the biennial, it's almost hidden in this one.)  No expert here, either, but it makes for good conversation...

Some pics of C. wanneri I have grown:

       

Ev donates seed to the NARGS seed ex every year, but I don't think she's ever sent this one.  I checked the last two years, at least, and she hasn't.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Campanula xtymsonii, apparently a hybrid of an odd couple, C. carpatica and C. pyramidalis, though considered by some to be just a form of C. carpatica (ref.: Nicholls: Dwarf Campanulas):

Campanula cochlearifolia 'Elizabeth Oliver' with its double flowers:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I wonder if Elizabeth Oliver is the one I see from time to time sold as a "temporary" flowering plant like a poinsettia or kalanchoe?  It sure looks like it.

What is that deeply toothed lance leaf (or leaflet) plant behind the Campanula xtymsonii?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Hi, Rick!  It's Sanguisorba tenuifolia 'Pink Elephant' (assuming I'm keying in on the right one).

Oh, that rang a bell... I think I recall hearing of Campanula 'Haylodgensis' being sold that way, to the extent that people seem not to even realize it's a hardy perennial.  I wonder if that's it?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Campanula hercegovina 'Nana':

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Yes Lori, that would be it, a sanguisorba.  I could have thought of it, but no... :D
----- thanks (about your ID suggestion for the campanula, too)

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

A few campanulas looking good now as summer gets into its stride. Campanula garganica 'Dickson's Gold' is one of those plants that just glows, a perfect combination of foliage and flower; 'Timsbury Perfection' is a seedling raised by Graham Nicholls, whose knowledge of campanulas is unrivalled, from a form of rotundifolia - my picture does it less than justice but it is a delicate and rather refined plant with neat foliage; and 'Covadonga', one of the most richly coloured of all campanulas, collected in Spain by Clarence Elliott over 70 years ago but rarely cultivated in recent times. Again it has that beautiful airy neatness about it - definitely a plant to propagate up.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

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