Miscellaneous Woodlanders

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WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Tim wrote:

Has anyone got any rain for our woodland? Hardly any since February - the garden is parched!

I cant' send you any either, Tim. We have (had) very dry weather also, maybe I should start thinking about growing more Cacti and Onco's  ;) ;)

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Tim wrote:

Has anyone got any rain for our woodland? Hardly any since February - the garden is parched!

If you have the pipeline I have the water! We had a very sunny and warm April but May has been rather wet. However the temperature has been higher than normal. More rain expected all the week.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Regarding Oxalis as groundcover - I prefere oxalis to any other groundcover plant! Oxalis is easy to grow and easy to remove, does not compete with the other plants and charming! And you can eat it!

I have grown Anemonella for years but they refuse to expand - only a few flowers a year :(

Skulski wrote:

Wow, absolutely beautiful scenes, Mark!  The photo of A. sikokianum is especially ethereal!  Can't wait to see the cyp in bloom, too.

Great Arisaema photo, Trond.  Eliot and Barbara Coleman used ducks to control slugs and snails... I doubt you'd want to travel to your cabin with a cage of ducks in tow but it would be an interesting thought.  ;)  (They are American organic gardeners who have published some very sensible books and had an organic gardening show on PBS TV.  Anyway, they had an enclosure for their pair of ducks that consisted of a shelter at one end and a hardware cloth "run", and the assembly could be lifted and moved on a daily basis to give them new grazing grounds.  They called it "Duckingham Palace"... )

I have read about people in Norway using ducks (Peking duck?) to control those molluscs but I have no wish to try! As you imagine: ducks in a cage! When the kids were small they had rabbits (they wanted a dog). We brought them with us every time we travelled except abroad. I am very glad that time came to an end!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I so enjoy seeing all these treasures!

Regarding slug control, one of our Chapter members uses chickens.

Lori, only your 'Rosea' is Thalictrum (Anemonella) thalictroides.  The white form is another species.  Leaves are completely different, and I think you will find that your white one's flowers always have five petals, while Thalictrum thalictroides blooms usually have more.  The single flower or umbel of T. thalictroides is always subtended by a single whorl of leaves.   Our common name for T. thalictroides is May flower, and they are native in the woods here.  I do grow them in my garden, too.  They are great fillers, flower much longer in the garden than in the wild, and I always have lots of volunteers to weed out.  ;D

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Oh, yes, that jolted my feeble memory, Rick!  Thank you!  The white one is Isopyrum biternatum.... right?  ;D

RickR wrote:

Thalictrum thalictroides... they are native in the woods here.  I do grow them in my garden, too.  They are great fillers, flower much longer in the garden than in the wild, and I always have lots of volunteers to weed out.  ;D

Many people will be extremely envious to hear that!   ;D

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Skulski wrote:

Oh, yes, that jolted my feeble memory, Rick!  Thank you!  The white one is Isopyrum biternatum.... right?  ;D

I do believe you are correct on that, but another name change:
Enemion (Isopyrum) biternatum

I have seen this one growing wild in southern Minnesota, building height (to 1+ ft) as it continues to add flowers to the stem.  (Flowers are not necessarily terminal.)  I have not seen it occur as a single stem, but usually find it as a clump 10-18 inches in diameter.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

At last! Clintonia andrewsiana has opened its flowers ;D I have planted this elegant plant in my woodland where it now reahes 80cm tall with 3 flowering stems.

           

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

At last! Clintonia andrewsiana has opened its flowers ;D I have planted this elegant plant in my woodland where it now reahes 80cm tall with 3 flowering stems.

Fantastic Clintonia Trond, the best species for sure.  I have always wanted to grow this one; your post reminds me to put this higher up on my list.  How did you keep the slugs away ;)

Did you grow it from seed or purchased plants?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

A really spectacular plant, Trond!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Hoy wrote:

At last! Clintonia andrewsiana has opened its flowers ;D I have planted this elegant plant in my woodland where it now reahes 80cm tall with 3 flowering stems.

Very flashy for a woodland plant!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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